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Montevideo Courses – 2021 Spring Accelerated

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

Semester students may enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of Spanish language plus electives in Latin American studies, business and gender studies. All students must complete a minimum of one language course, although we strongly encourage students to complete an entire language track.

Accelerated Spring Term: During the spring semester, the Montevideo program offers a collection of courses on an accelerated basis from January to mid-March. These courses are ideal for students from quarter-system universities because the dates often coincide with their winter quarter. Accelerated Spring students enroll in 8-12 semester credits comprised of courses in Spanish language, Latin American studies, business, and gender studies.

Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Spanish Language Tracks (Both Semesters)

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks in which courses are taught sequentially (back-to-back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in a track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it to be prepared for success at the next level. All students are required to spend the beginning of the fall and spring semesters taking the first course in a track, which allows for rapid acquisition of language and culture. Language courses are small and typically have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each. All language courses focus on the skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

Track I (4 or 8 credits total)—Prerequisite: none

  • Fall
    Spanish 100-level 4 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 100-level 4 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 100-level 4 credits Taught in Spanish

    Elementary Spanish I is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Spanish courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

  • Fall
    Spanish 100-level 4 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 100-level 4 credits Taught in Spanish

    Elementary Spanish II is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have taken one college Spanish course before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

    Prerequisite: one semester of college Spanish

Track II (3 or 6 credits total)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 200-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 200-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 200-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Intermediate Spanish I is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed a year of college Spanish or its equivalent. In this course, the students will learn to narrate in the main time-frames, as well as to recognize the different uses of the subjunctive mood in the expression of different degrees of certainty, of wishes and of advices.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 200-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 200-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Intermediate Spanish II is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed three semesters of college Spanish or their equivalent. In this course, the students will learn how to use the language with increasing complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

    Prerequisite: three semesters of college Spanish

Track III (3 or 6 credits total)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Composition I is a third year course for students who have completed two years of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of short stories will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Composition II is a third year course for students who have completed five semesters of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of short stories will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

    Prerequisite: five semesters of college Spanish

Track IV (3 or 6 credits total)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 400-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 400-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 400-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    This advanced level course of Spanish has been designed for students who have completed three years of Spanish and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

    Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 400-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 400-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Advanced Spanish II has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of Spanish and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

    Prerequisite: seven semesters of college Spanish

Fall Semester

Taught in English unless noted in Spanish. Courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III and above unless otherwise indicated.

Spanish Language Electives

  • Fall
    Spanish 300-level 1-3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 300-level 1-3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 300-level 1-3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Optional three-credit course that complements the development of linguistic competences facilitated at the two/three-hundred level courses, focusing in the oral skills in particular.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

Business and Entrepreneurship

  • Fall
    General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    Health business is a major global business opportunity driving future growth and national prosperity. Business managerial competences will be required in social and health care organizations nationally and internationally in the future.

    Ageing of population in many societies will challenge health care systems and processes to produce health care services in more efficient ways. Digitalization of customer relationship management and services is a major change and driver for new services and processes.

    The course provides an introduction to this -and others- key business and administration issues and concepts in the Health Care industry, as well as its current and future challenges.

  • Fall
    General Business Management Supply Chain Management 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    Students will learn business management principles and quantitative methods and models for decision-making. The course will cover key strategies of operations management such as linear programming, quality control, line balancing, inventory models, and simulation in a culturally diverse environment.

  • Fall
    Entrepreneurship General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    Entrepreneurship General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring Accelerated
    Entrepreneurship General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    The entrepreneurial spirit is within each student and is not something that can be taught. Students will enhance the natural entrepreneurial spirit by providing practical skills training and exposing students to the process of turning ideas into products. Students will explore a variety of frameworks and concepts used for discovery, business, and management. Guest speakers are also scheduled throughout the course to ensure students gain valuable information regarding software, tourism, and the food industries.

  • Fall
    Agriculture Geography 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    Agriculture Geography 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    Food is central to our lives; and in many more ways than the action of eating to sustain body and brain. Food is embedded in culture and acts as a strong binding link in families and societies and even between societies as food products and recipes travel the world. More importantly, what is less known is that food production and consumption stand at the crossroad of the big world challenges that humanity faces: hunger, poverty, energy, environment, climate change and population growth. Finally, access to food is a condition to the political stability of a country as mass demonstrations against high food prices (known as ‘food riots’) have showed in recent years.

    Prerequisites: introductory coursework in psychology or community health sciences

Latin American Studies | Gender Studies

  • Fall
    History Political Science Sociology 400-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    History Political Science Sociology 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

    This course examines the chain of events and situations, including the highly influential panorama of the Cold War years, and the socio-political situation in the region that led to the Peronist Movement in Argentina and its fall, plus the follow up of military “juntas”. It will also analyze the involutionary process of the highly accomplished Uruguayan Swiss style democracy and the complex and dramatic circumstances of the irruption of the armed groups of marxist orientations in the early 60´s, social violence and the gradual influence of the Uruguayan military. The connections between the two processes will be also studied, as well as the influence on them of the Cuban revolution, the Chile of Allende and the Brazilian case in the same period.

  • Fall
    Sociology Women's Studies / Gender Studies 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    This course provides an introduction to gender theory and women movements, emphasizing the role of different women’s organizations in local social movements. It constitutes an opportunity to explore Human Rights situation for women in Uruguay. From the dictatorship days until the present, the course will analyze how women organized to participate in political life, society and business. Through inviting some key characters from cultural and political life, the group will have the chance to discuss these topics first hand, with women that were part of these processes. The 14th Latin American and the Caribbean Feminist Encounter will take place in Montevideo on November 23, 24 and 25, and this will be as well an amazing opportunity to get involved with women’s local and regional movements.

  • Fall
    Anthropology 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    This course looks at major topics shaping Latin American society today, including gender, race, indigenous resistance, immigration, and the drug trade. For each topic, we will study its historical development, current characteristics, and manifestations in cultural products like art, film, and telenovelas. Through local news sources and interviews with area residents, we will pay particular attention to how these topics affect Uruguay and Argentina. In the end, students will be able to discuss the relationship between politics, economics, society, and culture, as well as how general Latin American issues affect different regions in different ways.

  • Fall
    Anthropology History 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    Anthropology History 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    The course provides an introduction to the history and culture of the Rio de la Plata region, specifically Uruguay and Argentina, with a focus on recent history. It examines:

    to the 1850s: the pre-conquest native populations; the Spanish conquest and settlement; colonial institutions; Spanish-Portuguese rivalry in the region; the independence movements; and caudillo rule;

    from the 1850s to the 1950s: development of the export economies, rise of oligarchic government; democratization; creation of Latin America’s first social welfare state in Uruguay; and the populism of Juan Domingo Perón in Argentina; and

    from the 1950s to present: the impact of the Cuban Revolution on the Río de la Plata; the Tupamaro urban guerrillas in Uruguay; the “dirty war” in Argentina; and contemporary issues.

    The course also examines the foundation of Buenos Aires and Montevideo and the influences of European populations on the cultural patterns that define “Che” culture of Rio de la Plata. Similarities and differences between Argentinean and Uruguayan culture (religion, sports, cinema, clothing, food, family, music, politics, economy, environment, etc.) will be explored.

  • Fall
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    A panoramic vision of Latin American literature, from its beginnings to the 20th century. The course will study the evolution of different genre, fundamentally the novel, poetry and theater, through their more important movements, as well as representative key works.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish World Languages and Literatures 400-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    This course will cover topics in Latin American literature to develop students' ability to analyze texts and its relationship to the political and cultural environment of its time. Students will examine the evolution of the short story in different periods and key authors in the production of this literary genre.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college level Spanish

Spring Semester/Accelerated Spring Term

Courses availalbe during the Accelerated Spring term are identified in the dropdown menu

Courses are taught in English unless noted in Spanish. Courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III and above unless otherwise indicated.

Spanish Language Electives

  • Spring
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    The objective of this course is to enable students to develop competence in an area which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. You will become familiar with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order to enable you to communicate correctly in the target language. Business writing, correspondence, oral and written translation of business related material is also practiced.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish.

  • Spring
    Spanish Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    The foundation of successful intercultural negotiation is advanced knowledge and usage of various tools. Typical negotiation strategies are not applicable in multi-cultural settings. Students will explore a variety of readings, case studies, and mock negotiations to acquire the theoretical knowledge and skills to successfully negotiate in multi-cultural settings.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Spanish 300-level 1-3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring
    Spanish 300-level 1-3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Spanish 300-level 1-3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Optional three-credit course that complements the development of linguistic competences facilitated at the two/three-hundred level courses, focusing in the oral skills in particular.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

Business and Entrepreneurship

  • Spring
    Agriculture Marketing 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

    Marketing relies heavily on understanding and communicating effectively with people of different backgrounds. In agribusiness marketing, this includes varied populations such as farmers, suppliers, consumers, and legislators – all with different (and sometimes conflicting) concerns and/or goals. Understanding the differing points of view and interests of each group is essential for the successful management and marketing in the Agribusiness field. The objective of the course is to help students understand both the components of the agribusiness market, and the people involved in it. Students will analyze market data, identify changes in demand, and communicate and develop marketing messages for multiple audiences in order to increase demand.

  • Spring
    Geography Natural Resources 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

    The objective of the course is to introduce students to the multifaceted challenges that our environment faces, explore future trends, and possible solutions. The course will focus on the environmental regulations, government actions in Latin America and Actual Intervention Approach. The environment is central to our lives, and maintaining it stands as one of the great world challenges that humanity faces at the present. What are the risks? How do we recognize them? And what are some of the solutions to improve environmental sustainability? Topics include: waste management, waste water management, air emissions, environmental policies, and sustainable businesses.

  • Spring
    General Business Management Supply Chain Management 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

    The course aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the range of issues and pitfalls that must be recognized, assessed, and managed in the wine business industry, all while minimizing production shortfalls and dealing with day to day operational challenges.

    At the end of the semester, students will have a better understanding of wine, the wine industry, and the unique supply chain management protocols. Students will be fully immersed in the community of vineyards and wineries in the region. The course offers in-class lectures, guest speakers, and the opportunity to visit local vineyards and wineries in the countryside. There is also a special harvesting activity in the South Cone scheduled during the course. Students will be offered the opportunity to experience every step of the production process including, growing and care procedures, harvesting, using machinery and technology, bottling, and packaging. There will also be lessons on environmental impacts, and human resources.

    Prerequisite: introductory-level college business course

  • Fall
    Entrepreneurship General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    Entrepreneurship General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring Accelerated
    Entrepreneurship General Business 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    The entrepreneurial spirit is within each student and is not something that can be taught. Students will enhance the natural entrepreneurial spirit by providing practical skills training and exposing students to the process of turning ideas into products. Students will explore a variety of frameworks and concepts used for discovery, business, and management. Guest speakers are also scheduled throughout the course to ensure students gain valuable information regarding software, tourism, and the food industries.

  • Fall
    Agriculture Geography 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    Agriculture Geography 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    Food is central to our lives; and in many more ways than the action of eating to sustain body and brain. Food is embedded in culture and acts as a strong binding link in families and societies and even between societies as food products and recipes travel the world. More importantly, what is less known is that food production and consumption stand at the crossroad of the big world challenges that humanity faces: hunger, poverty, energy, environment, climate change and population growth. Finally, access to food is a condition to the political stability of a country as mass demonstrations against high food prices (known as ‘food riots’) have showed in recent years.

    Prerequisites: introductory coursework in psychology or community health sciences

  • Spring
    Horticulture and Viticulture 200-level 1 credit Taught in English

    This field study course is designed to provide students an academic and cultural experience of visiting and learning from vineyards and local wine cellars in the countryside area. The aim is to familiarize students with the rich wine culture and development of its industry in Uruguay.

    While visiting the locations, students will learn first-hand about the harvest, growing and care procedures related to the grapes and vines, bottling, and the packaging process. Also related, they will learn about the business of winemaking, marketing, promotion, shipping, exporting, operations, logistics, etc. Differences in small and large, family and corporate-run vineyards will be addressed.

    The vineyards / companies we will visit were chosen purposely for their varying sizes, styles, focuses and products, in order to provide an authentic and thorough learning opportunity for students.

    This course has an additional fee.

Latin American Studies | Gender Studies

  • Spring
    Film 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Film 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    Review of the birth of the Uruguayan cinema. Review of most important Uruguayan cinematographic institutions. Analysis of the form, content, directing, editing, social relevance, and history of recent films from or about Argentina and Uruguay. Special emphasis in contemporary tendencies of Art Cinema, Documentaries and Independent Cinema.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

  • Spring
    Sociology Women's Studies / Gender Studies 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring Accelerated
    Sociology Women's Studies / Gender Studies 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    Women’s activism gained strong visibility in the past few years, particularly enhanced by the power of new technologies and the Internet. This course provides an introduction to gender theory and women movements, exploring the more recent strategies of feminists and women’s movements to get together and fight against gender violence of all kinds, using the Internet and social networks as a powerful tool. We will study some international examples, as well as local examples like the #NiUnaMenos movement, that started in Argentina and expanded throughout Latin America to fight against femicide, and other self-organized events like the #EFD (Encuentro de Feministas Desorganizadas) that recently took place in Montevideo. The course will have a strong practical basis, including attending to some of the meetings to organize the 2018 International Women’s day (March 8th), that got together more than 300 thousand people in 2017 (in a 3 million people country). The interaction with some of the local main characters of this new ways of activism will give the students the opportunity to discuss these topics first hand, addressing as well the new forms of ‘Internet violence’ that emerge as a reaction.

  • Spring
    Dance 100-level 1 credit Taught in English and Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Dance 100-level 1 credit Taught in English and Spanish

    The Latin American Dances class is addressed to those students who enjoy dancing and want to learn how to relate traditional Latin American dances like “Cha chachá”, “Son”, “Bolero” “Merengue”, “Salsa”, “Guaracha”, “Cumbia” and so on. At the same time, the students have the chance to practice Spanish and become more acquainted with the Latin American culture.

  • Spring
    Latin American Studies 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    This course examines the political and social dimensions of health and environment in Latin America, including the influence of poverty, race, gender, and religion. Through topics such as HIV/AIDS, nutrition, climate change, and mental health, students will become aware of the cultural factors that shape understandings of sickness and health and determine our interactions with the environment. We will also examine governmental and private responses to public health and environmental crises in the region. Course includes visits to and from local health agencies and environmental organizations.

  • Spring
    Nutrition 200-level 1 credit Taught in English and Spanish
    Spring Accelerated
    Nutrition 200-level 1 credit Taught in English and Spanish

    The Latin American Cuisine class is intended for students who enjoy cooking and want to learn how to prepare traditional Latin American dishes like “ceviche”, “picadillo”, “empanadas”, “tres leches”, and so on. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to practice Spanish and become more acquainted with the Latin American culture.

    The program changes depending of the time of the year and the products available in the market. For that reason, the menu will vary every session. The dishes are based on beef, cereals, sea food products, homemade pasta, and dressings.

  • Fall
    History Political Science Sociology 400-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    History Political Science Sociology 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

    This course examines the chain of events and situations, including the highly influential panorama of the Cold War years, and the socio-political situation in the region that led to the Peronist Movement in Argentina and its fall, plus the follow up of military “juntas”. It will also analyze the involutionary process of the highly accomplished Uruguayan Swiss style democracy and the complex and dramatic circumstances of the irruption of the armed groups of marxist orientations in the early 60´s, social violence and the gradual influence of the Uruguayan military. The connections between the two processes will be also studied, as well as the influence on them of the Cuban revolution, the Chile of Allende and the Brazilian case in the same period.

  • Spring
    Political Science Sociology 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    This course will cover topics in modern Latin American society, including social justice, drug trafficking, and structural corruption. Students will develop the ability to identify specific events that have taken place in Rio de la Plata in the last twenty years, analyze these events through various theoretical perspectives, and hypothesize its impact on future generations.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

  • Fall
    Anthropology History 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
    Spring
    Anthropology History 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

    The course provides an introduction to the history and culture of the Rio de la Plata region, specifically Uruguay and Argentina, with a focus on recent history. It examines:

    to the 1850s: the pre-conquest native populations; the Spanish conquest and settlement; colonial institutions; Spanish-Portuguese rivalry in the region; the independence movements; and caudillo rule;

    from the 1850s to the 1950s: development of the export economies, rise of oligarchic government; democratization; creation of Latin America’s first social welfare state in Uruguay; and the populism of Juan Domingo Perón in Argentina; and

    from the 1950s to present: the impact of the Cuban Revolution on the Río de la Plata; the Tupamaro urban guerrillas in Uruguay; the “dirty war” in Argentina; and contemporary issues.

    The course also examines the foundation of Buenos Aires and Montevideo and the influences of European populations on the cultural patterns that define “Che” culture of Rio de la Plata. Similarities and differences between Argentinean and Uruguayan culture (religion, sports, cinema, clothing, food, family, music, politics, economy, environment, etc.) will be explored.

  • Spring
    Anthropology Other Foreign Language 200-level 1 credit Taught in English
    Spring Accelerated
    Anthropology Other Foreign Language 200-level 1 credit Taught in English

    This field study course is designed to provide students an academic and cultural experience of visiting and learning from direct experience. The aim is to familiarize students with the rich culture and history of the region and Uruguay.

    While visiting different sites in the country, museums, iconic buildings, and classic neighborhoods, and through the rich interaction with local people, students will learn first-hand about history and traditions, and how they can inform our understanding of Rio de la Plata today.

    The places/sites we will visit will be chosen purposely for their relevant historical and cultural significance, in order to provide an authentic and thorough learning opportunity for students.

    Co-requisite: Rio de la Plata - People and Culture.

    This course has an additional fee.

  • Spring
    Spanish 300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

    A broad view of the evolution of the different literary genres of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries during the 20th century. Several key works will be studied as well as many literary fragments in order to provide a well-rounded vision of this century, including García Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Borges, Vargas Llosa and others.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

Field Studies

Deepen your academic experience through an optional field study course where you will explore the cultural, historical, and natural features of the region. Students who enroll in these 1-credit courses will select a particular topic of interest to examine as part of the field study and complete a research paper drawing from their field study experience as well as from additional readings, research, and written assignments.

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development. Students are placed in an authentic local environment with exposure to culture and Spanish language. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC; rather, it will be determined by your application, supporting materials, and an interview with the internship sponsor on-site.

Eligibility: Enrollment in the Montevideo program, a minimum GPA of 3.0, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $200 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

Cultural Enrichment Workshops

Enhance your studies through non-credit workshops designed to provide opportunities for deeper engagement with unique aspects of Uruguayan life and culture.

  • Fall
    Spring

    Museums are story capsules. Not only are they places where artists' work live, but they are also spaces where different stories are told. Sometimes that includes the history of country (recognizing that perspective and position are important), or the life of an artist. Museums are educational institutions as much as cultural institutions. This workshop will consist of visiting different museums and understanding the goal/mission of each museum. We will explore questions such as, "what is a museum's relationship and/or duty to society to provide accurate and inclusive information?" We will talk about the different types of museums that exist in Uruguay - from artistic, to cultural to social and political, and the way they bridge that connection through their exhibitions.

    (non-credit opportunity)
  • Spring

    This workshop will encourage students to photograph all around the city of Montevideo. Each student can choose a type of photography that they are interested in. This includes, but is not limited to: Portraits, landscape, building landscape, street activity. Based on that theme, we will travel to different places together and document our experiences. Each student is encouraged to post at least one photograph per location.

    (non-credit opportunity)
  • Fall

    This workshop will encourage students to photograph all around the city of Montevideo. Each student can choose a type of photography that they are interested in. This includes, but is not limited to: Portraits, landscape, building landscape, street activity. Based on that theme, we will travel to different places together and document our experiences. Each student is encouraged to post at least one photograph per location.

    (non-credit opportunity)

Quick Details

2020-21 App. Cycle

Spring: Open

Spring Accelerated (Jan-March): Open

2021-22 App. Cycle

Summer programs: Open

Eligibility

Minimum 2.5 GPA

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

US Credit

Program Capacity

50 students

Instruction

English/Spanish

Passport & Visa

Passport & Visa Information