Montevideo, Uruguay
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Montevideo, Uruguay | 2017 Fall

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of Spanish language study plus electives in Latin American studies, agribusiness, business, viticulture, and gender studies. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Spanish Language Tracks

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks in which courses are taught sequentially (back-to-back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in a track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it to be prepared for success at the next level. All students are required to spend the beginning of the fall and spring semesters taking an intensive Spanish course, which allows for rapid acquisition of language and culture. Language courses are small and typically have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each. All language courses focus on the skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. After the intensive period, students have the option to continue their language studies at the next level for the duration of the semester.

Track I (4 or 8 credits total)—Prerequisite: none

Track II (3 or 6 credits total)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

Track III (3 or 6 credits total)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

Track IV (3 or 6 credits total)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

Fall Semester

Taught in English unless noted in Spanish. Courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III and above unless otherwise indicated.

Agribusiness | Viticulture

Latin American Studies | Gender Studies

Spanish Language Electives

Spring Semester

Taught in English unless noted in Spanish. Courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III and above unless otherwise indicated.

Agribusiness | Viticulture

Latin American Studies | Gender Studies

Spanish Language Electives

Field Studies

Deepen your academic experience through an optional field study course where you will explore the cultural, historical, and natural features of the region. Students who enroll in these 1-credit courses will select a particular topic of interest to examine as part of the field study and complete a research paper drawing from their field study experience as well as from additional readings, research, and written assignments.

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development. Students are placed in an authentic local environment with exposure to culture and Spanish language. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC; rather, it will be determined by your application, supporting materials, and an interview with the internship sponsor on-site.

Eligibility: Enrollment in the Montevideo program, a minimum GPA of 3.0, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professor is also teaching as a Visiting Professor.

Fall

Dr. Tom Wright, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Dr. Tom Wright is a distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His main teaching field and research interest is Latin American history. He has published extensively on various aspects of that history. Dr. Wright will be teaching the History component of the following course:

Spring

Dr. Carolina Viera, Boise State University

Carolina Viera is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at Boise State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis specializing in discourse analysis and second language acquisition, and her M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from the University of New Mexico. She was born and raised in Montevideo, Uruguay. Dr. Viera will be teaching the following courses:

Course Descriptions

Advanced Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

This advanced level course of Spanish has been designed for students who have completed three years of Spanish and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

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Advanced Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Advanced Spanish II has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of Spanish and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

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Agribusiness Management

Fall (Agriculture, Management; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course covers business management principles applied to the operation of commercial farms/ranches and food processing/manufacturing firms.

The student will have access to the managerial functions performed by organizations throughout the agribusiness sector, while providing a system–wide perspective of managerial problems confronting such organizations.

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Agribusiness Marketing

Spring (Agriculture; 200-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Business Spanish

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to enable students to develop competence in an area which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. You will become familiar with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order to enable you to communicate correctly in the target language. Business writing, correspondence, oral and written translation of business related material is also practiced. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish - Prerequisite of 4 semesters of college Spanish.

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Cinema of Uruguay and Argentina

Fall (Film; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Film; 300-level; 3 credits)

Review of the birth of the Uruguayan cinema. Review of most important Uruguayan cinematographic institutions. Analysis of the form, content, directing, editing, social relevance, and history of recent films from or about Argentina and Uruguay. Special emphasis in contemporary tendencies of Art Cinema, Documentaries and Independent Cinema.

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Contemporary Women's Activism

Spring (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Dances of Latin America

Fall (Dance; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Dance; 100-level; 1 credit)

The Latin American Dances class is addressed to those students who enjoy dancing and want to learn how to relate traditional Latin American dances like “Cha chachá”, “Son”, “Bolero” “Merengue”, “Salsa”, “Guaracha”, “Cumbia” and so on. At the same time, the students have the chance to practice Spanish and become more acquainted with the Latin American culture.

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Elementary Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish I is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Spanish courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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Elementary Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish II is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have taken one college Spanish course before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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Environment: A World of Limited Resources

Spring (Natural Resources; 200-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Intermediate Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermediate Spanish I is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed a year of college Spanish or its equivalent. In this course, the students will learn to narrate in the main time-frames, as well as to recognize the different uses of the subjunctive mood in the expression of different degrees of certainty, of wishes and of advices.

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Intermediate Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermediate Spanish II is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed three semesters of college Spanish or their equivalent. In this course, the students will learn how to use the language with increasing complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

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Introduction to Viticulture

Spring (Agriculture; 200-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Latin American Cuisine

Fall (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

The Latin American Cuisine class is addressed to those students who enjoy cooking and want to learn how to prepare traditional Latin American dishes like “ceviche”, “picadillo”, “empanadas”, “tres leches”, and so on. At the same time, the students have the chance to practice Spanish and become more acquainted with the Latin American culture.

This is a program that changes depending of the time of the year and the products available in the market. For that reason, the menu varies every session. The dishes are based on beef, cereals, sea food products, homemade pasta, and dressings. Traditional Latin American cuisine does incoporate, meat, dairy, eggs, and gluten. Students with specific dietary restrictions may not be able to eat all the food prepared in class.

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Latin American Social Revolutions

Fall (History, Political Science, Sociology; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (History, Political Science, Sociology; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course examines the major social revolutions that occurred in Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries. Beginning with the only successful slave rebellion that brought forth the independent Republic of Haiti (1791-1804), through the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions and going to the Nicaraguan Revolution. The cases of Chile and El Salvador will also be studied. Students will analyze the causes, nature and consequences of these revolutions in America.

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Latin American Women's Voices: Argentina and Uruguay

Fall (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to gender theory and women movements, emphasizing the role of different women’s organizations in local social movements. It constitutes an opportunity to explore Human Rights situation for women in Uruguay. From the dictatorship days until the present, the course will analyze how women organized to participate in political life, society and business. Through inviting some key characters from cultural and political life, the group will have the chance to discuss these topics first hand, with women that were part of these processes. The 14th Latin American and the Caribbean Feminist Encounter will take place in Montevideo on November 23, 24 and 25, and this will be as well an amazing opportunity to get involved with women’s local and regional movements.

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Rio de la Plata - History and Culture

Fall (Anthropology, History; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Anthropology, History; 300-level; 3 credits)

The course provides an introduction to the history and culture of the Rio de la Plata region, specifically Uruguay and Argentina, with a focus on recent history. It examines:

to the 1850s: the pre-conquest native populations; the Spanish conquest and settlement; colonial institutions; Spanish-Portuguese rivalry in the region; the independence movements; and caudillo rule;

from the 1850s to the 1950s: development of the export economies, rise of oligarchic government; democratization; creation of Latin America’s first social welfare state in Uruguay; and the populism of Juan Domingo Perón in Argentina; and

from the 1950s to present: the impact of the Cuban Revolution on the Río de la Plata; the Tupamaro urban guerrillas in Uruguay; the “dirty war” in Argentina; and contemporary issues.

The course also examines the foundation of Buenos Aires and Montevideo and the influences of European populations on the cultural patterns that define “Che” culture of Rio de la Plata. Similarities and differences between Argentinean and Uruguayan culture (religion, sports, cinema, clothing, food, family, music, politics, economy, environment, etc.) will be explored.

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Rio de la Plata Field Study

Fall (Anthropology, Other Foreign Language; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Anthropology, Other Foreign Language; 200-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to provide students an academic and cultural experience of visiting and learning from direct experience. The aim is to familiarize students with the rich culture and history of the region and Uruguay.

While visiting different sites in the country, museums, iconic buildings, and classic neighborhoods, and through the rich interaction with local people, students will learn first-hand about history and traditions, and how they can inform our understanding of Rio de la Plata today.

The places/sites we will visit will be chosen purposely for their relevant historical and cultural significance, in order to provide an authentic and thorough learning opportunity for students.

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Spanish Composition I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Composition I is a third year course for students who have completed two years of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of short stories will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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Spanish Composition II

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Composition II is a third year course for students who have completed five semesters of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of short stories will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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Spanish Conversation and Oral Skills

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 1 - 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 1 - 3 credits)

Optional three-credit course that complements the development of linguistic competences facilitated at the two/three-hundred level courses, focusing in the oral skills in particular.

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Survey of Latin American Literature I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

A panoramic vision of Latin American literature, from its beginnings to the 20th century. The course will study the evolution of different genre, fundamentally the novel, poetry and theater, through their more important movements, as well as representative key works.

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Survey of Latin American Literature II

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

A broad view of the evolution of the different literary genres of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries during the 20th century. Several key works will be studied as well as many literary fragments in order to provide a well-rounded vision of this century, including García Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Borges, Vargas Llosa and others.

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Teaching English as a Foreign Language in Developing Countries

Spring (400-level; 3 credits)

This course is an introductory TEFL course intended for anyone interested in teaching English abroad. Students will learn about key theoretical concepts related to language acquisition and language teaching. The course combines lecture time with observation of language classes and conversations with participants of the Uruguayan English Teaching System. The main objective is to provide students with a better understanding of the connection between teaching and culture. A secondary goal is to learn how to adjust our teaching approach and expectations to different local realities, cultural assumptions about learning, and access to educational resources.

The course is taught in English but students with advanced level of Spanish may choose to write their written projects in Spanish

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The Global Food Challenge

Fall (Agriculture, Geography; 300-level; 3 credits)

Food is central to our lives; and in many more ways than the action of eating to sustain body and brain. Food is embedded in culture and acts as a strong binding link in families and societies and even between societies as food products and recipes travel the world. More importantly, what is less known is that food production and consumption stand at the crossroad of the big world challenges that humanity faces: hunger, poverty, energy, environment, climate change and population growth. Finally, access to food is a condition to the political stability of a country as mass demonstrations against high food prices (known as ‘food riots’) have showed in recent years.

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Uruguayan Music and Culture

Spring (Anthropology; 300-level; 3 credits)

In Montevideo, there is a plethora of musical expressions. This course focuses on understanding Montevidean culture via the analysis of its music. We will explore different music styles: candombe, murga, folklore, tango, and heavy rock through on-site participation, observation and interaction. We aim to answer two guiding questions: a) how is music deeply rooted in culture? and b) what can we learn about Montevideans through the study of their musical texts (lyrics) and musical events? This course provides training in ethnographic research techniques and discourse analysis, and is intended for anyone interested in language and music with no musical background.

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Viticulture Field Study

Fall (Horticulture and Viticulture; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Horticulture and Viticulture; 200-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to provide students an academic and cultural experience of visiting and learning from vineyards and local wine cellars in the countryside area. The aim is to familiarize students with the rich wine culture and development of its industry in Uruguay.

While visiting the locations, students will learn first-hand about the harvest, growing and care procedures related to the grapes and vines, bottling, and the packaging process. Also related, they will learn about the business of winemaking, marketing, promotion, shipping, exporting, operations, logistics, etc. Differences in small and large, family and corporate-run vineyards will be addressed.

The vineyards / companies we will visit were chosen purposely for their varying sizes, styles, focuses and products, in order to provide an authentic and thorough learning opportunity for students.

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