Madrid, Spain
USAC
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Madrid Courses - 2019 Fall

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of a language track plus electives in literature and language, and Spanish and European studies. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Visiting Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professors are also teaching as Visiting Professors.

Fall Semester:

Dr. Liahna Gordon | California State University, Chico

Courses offered:

Liahna Gordon has been a Visiting Professor with USAC three times and has been living in Spain for the past year and a half. She teaches the sociology of sexuality, gender, social theory, and research methods. Her most recent research is on sex work in Spain. She is the author of a textbook called Real Research, now in its second edition.

Spring Semester:

Dr. Raquel Anido | Clemson University

Courses offered:

Raquel Anido holds a Ph.D. in Spanish from Johns Hopkins University (2010) and a Licenciatura in Law from the University of Barcelona (2003). At Clemson University she teaches courses on Spanish culture and world cinema. She is the author of El pasado en solfa: La música literaria y fílmica de la España contemporánea (Barcelona: Anthropos, 2018).

Spanish Language Tracks

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks in which courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. Enrollment in the entire track is mandatory. If you have already taken the first course in a track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it to be prepared for success at the next level. Language courses are small and typically have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Track I (14 credits total)—Prerequisite: none

    Track II (12 credits total)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

    Track III (9 credits total)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

    Track IV (6 credits total)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

    Fall Semester

    Spanish Language and Literature Electives

    Taught in Spanish

    Art and Spanish/European Studies

    Courses are taught in English or Spanish. Courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III or above unless otherwise indicated. Many of these elective courses will be shared with other international students attending the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos.

    Spring Semester

    Spanish Language and Literature Electives

    Taught in Spanish

    Art and Spanish/European Studies

    Courses are taught in English or Spanish. Courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III or above unless otherwise indicated. Many of these elective courses will be shared with other international students attending the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos.

     

    Field Studies

    Deepen your academic experience through an exciting four-day, 1-credit field study course where you will explore the cultural, historical, and natural features of a distinctive region of Spain through carefully planned excursions. These experiences combined with academic components (readings, research, written assignments, reports, etc.) deepen your understanding of the sites and locales visited. To participate, students are required to enroll in the field study course and complete the assigned work. This course cannot be taken as an audit and counts as part of your credit load. Optional field studies have an additional fee and are subject to meeting minimum enrollment requirements to run. In the fall semester, the field study will go to the Basque Country; in spring it will be in Andalucía.

    Internships

    USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development and are counted as part of your credit load. Students are placed in a Spanish-speaking environment, with high exposure to culture and language, and must be able to communicate at an advanced language level. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses.

    Madrid internship opportunities fall into broad categories; previous placements have included: an art gallery, a primary school, a business incubator, a local high school, non-profit organizations, and extracurricular activities/tutoring for disadvantaged youth. Other internship sites are possible but require at least three months advance notification so that the internship coordinator can attempt to find something that suits you. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview on site with the internship sponsor. For most positions, students will be required to attend orientation training sessions at the beginning of the internship.

    Eligibility: enrollment in the Madrid program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 and junior standing at the time of the internship. Students must submit their resume in English and Spanish and the application forms at least eight weeks in advance, and include a short essay in Spanish describing what they hope to achieve as an intern. A refundable fee of $200 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

    Course Descriptions

    Advanced Spanish I

    Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

    This advanced level course of Spanish has been designed for students who have completed three years of Spanish and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

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    Advanced Spanish II

    Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

    Advanced Spanish II (SPN 411) has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of Spanish and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

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    Advanced Spanish Translation

    Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

    This course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of translation from Spanish into English and vice versa, through readings and different types of exercises on the translation of different text genres.

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    Advanced Spanish Writing and Stylistics

    Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

    Advanced Spanish Writing and Stylistics is an elective course for students of Spanish as a second language at an advanced level, who have probably taken at least three years of college Spanish. The goal of this course is to enhace the writing abilities, taking the written text as a contextualized communication event, addressed to an audience and with a clear and defined purpose. Therefore, class activities are centered around the analysis and the understading of different written genres, so that they can be produced latter. In addition, this course does not neglect the oral interaction and expression, since the class is conducted entirely in Spanish, reinforcing collaboration through group work.

    El curso de Escritura Avanzada y Estilística es una clase optativa para alumnos de español como segunda lengua que tengan un nivel avanzado, equivalente a tres años de español a nivel de universidad. El objetivo principal de este curso es la mejora de las habilidades escritas, entendiéndose el texto escrito como acto de comunicación contextualizado dirigido a un receptor concreto y con un propósito claro y bien definido. Por lo tanto, las actividades de clase se centran en el análisis y la comprensión de los diferentes géneros escritos para su posterior producción. Asimismo, este curso no olvida la interacción y la expresión orales, puesto que toda la clase se desarrolla exclusivamente en español, reforzándose la colaboración por medio del trabajo en grupos.

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    Andalucía Field Study

    Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)

    There is much more to Spain than its capital. Hence, the aim of this course is to introduce students to regions beyond the confines of Madrid. As autonomous learners, students who opt to do the Field Study course will develop a more global view of Spain and its history, culture, geography and people. This will be achieved through reading and basic investigation, both within and outside Andalusia. As a result, students will come to better understand the diversity of Iberian cultures, in particular that of Andalusia.

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    Contemporary Spanish Music Cultures: A Historical Overview

    Fall (Anthropology, History, Music; 300-level; 3 credits)

    The course will draw upon current frameworks in ethnomusicology and culture studies in order to examine several important aspects of music-making and reception in contemporary Spain such as identity, collective sociability, and musical change.

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    Drawing Madrid

    Fall (Art; 100-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Art; 100-level; 3 credits)

    This is an on-site art studio course, based on drawing, open to art and non-art majors. Previous

    drawing experience is not needed.

    In this course, students will explore and develop drawing skills through the completion of a travel sketchbook. Taking as a point of departure the notion of the city as a social form and students’ positioning as travelers in Madrid, this course offers an exploration of the city through drawing and interactions with the visual arts. In dialogue with Michel De Certeau’s understanding of everyday practices like walking as ways to create spaces that contest dominant city circuits, we will visit and draw prominent sites - monuments, museums, neighborhoods, gardens, among others. Students’ sketchbooks will be related to students’ own artistic and intellectual projects and will allow them to experience the city in unique ways.

    Weekly reviews of their work will allow students to develop drawing skills gradually in order to reach the goal of understanding and using drawing as a powerful visual form of communication. Students will have weekly individual feedback on their drawings and homework.

    Drawing techniques, art history, and cultural theory readings, as well as references to contemporary painters and artwork will be used to demonstrate concepts discussed in class and to broaden student's visual vocabulary and understanding of art.

    Students will produce a sketchbook during the semester based on drawings made during class time, site visits and homework. Students’ conclusions and experiences will be reflected in a final project. Students’ final drawing will be directly related to their own interests and intellectual projects.

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    Economic and Political Institutions of the European Union

    Spring (Economics, History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

    From Ancient times, many thinkers have tried to create a politically united Europe. After WWII the conditions materialized and since then, we have experienced the process of integration and the creation of European Law. Currently, EU´s political, economic and legal agreements affect not only its Member States but also the rest of the World, in a similar way that the USA does. This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major political and economic changes occurred in the European Union (Economic European Communities until 1992) after the Second World War. Special attention will be given to the study of institutional and public policy issues. The course will examine the ongoing process of the making of the EU. In addition to a review of the history of European integration, its nature and functioning will also be analyzed. Finally it will focus on a discussion of specific issues related to current problems facing European construction, and the challenges ahead.

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    Elementary Spanish I

    Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

    Elementary Spanish I (SPN 111) is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Spanish courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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    Elementary Spanish II

    Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

    Elementary Spanish II (SPN 112) is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have taken one course of Spanish at college-level or its equivalent before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence. It provides opportunities for the development of the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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    Exploring Music and Society: Flamenco

    Spring (Anthropology, Music, Sociology; 200-level; 3 credits)

    This course is designed to facilitate an informed understanding of flamenco. Broadly defined, flamenco is a complex performative art which includes song (cante), dance (baile), and guitar music (toque). Tracing its origins to the mid-nineteenth century, flamenco is a music associated with the gitano (gypsy) community, instrumental in its development and who represent the majority of its practitioners. The exoticization of Spain during the 19th century enhanced the aura that flamenco radiated, and by 1940, flamenco grew to become a powerful national icon. It continues to be regarded as the quintessential expression of Spanish folk music. Our emphasis is on acquiring both an aural as well as a historical and theoretical knowledge of flamenco.

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    Government and Politics in Spain

    Fall (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

    A view of the actual political circumstances of the Spanish state. Particular attention is given to analyzing the post-Franco democratic process and the creation of autonomous communities. (Fall semester)

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    Intermediate Spanish I

    Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

    This course emphasizes learning the structure of the Spanish language. Classes are divided into three components: grammar/vocabulary, conversation and reading/writing, each of which is related to the themes covered. A review of basic elements, such as the present tense, ser and estar, preterit and imperfect, etc. is included. Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish.

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    Intermediate Spanish II

    Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

    Spanish 212 (Intermediate II) is a course designed for students who have completed a year and a half of college Spanish or its equivalent and want to learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

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    Latin American and Spanish Dances

    Fall (Dance, Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)
    Spring (Dance, Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)

    The dance rehearsals will be held with taped music. Students will learn array of Spanish and Latin American dances including: Tango, Salsa, Merengue, Cumbia, Cha-cha cha, and Flamenco (Sevillanas).

    There will be an introduction to the meaning and “spirit“ of the dance, followed by the practice of the steps and movements without music and ending with the addition of music to the previously learned steps.

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    Modern Spanish Culture through Service Learning

    Spring (Service Learning, Sociology, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    Using a service-learning experience as a field laboratory, this course seeks to examine the socioeconomic, cultural, political, and historic elements that shaped and continue to shape modern Madrid. Students work 42 total hours (2 hours and 40 minutes per week) alongside Spanish volunteers and their professor in a soup kitchen that serves over 100 people. Once a week, the students, under the guidance of volunteers from all strata of Spanish society, prepare meals, serve lunch, wash up and fulfill other on-site activities to complete the service-learning component of this course. Students will also volunteer at Pan y Peces (a local food bank) during the semester on February 8nd and March 8th (9:00-12:30) with other USAC Madrid students. To complete academic credits, students will meet once a week (26 total hours) in a classroom setting to participate in engaging cross-cultural communication activities, give presentations on research, debrief, and reflect on weekly service. Student will also be given class time to work on their midterm and final projects.

    This course will encourage students to meet locals, explore different parts of Madrid on their own, and analyze the intercultural dynamics they observe during their volunteer experience while improving their Spanish language skills and witnessing social justice in modern-day Spanish culture firsthand. Through pre-service lectures, cross-cultural communication exercises, weekly in-class reflections, presentations, visits to Madrid neighborhoods and museums as well as 42 volunteer hours in a soup kitchen and food bank, this course will:

    1. Encourage students’ immersion into the study abroad environment through experiences that will improve skills in Spanish language proficiency and cross-cultural interaction.

    2. Provide students with real world volunteer experience with local organizations and highlight the purpose of these organizations within the larger context of Spanish reality.

    3. Facilitate Spanish language learning by establishing social connections in their new communities while underscoring the importance of social justice and the diversity of Spanish culture.

    4. Enhance the students’ academic curriculum by integrating service activities that allow them to meet a real community need.

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    Photojournalism/Visual Journalism

    Spring (Art, Journalism; 300-level; 3 credits)

    Students will begin by navigating and engaging their new surroundings with their cameras through a series of short assignments. They will then learn to define and apply what makes a good, information-full photograph and begin to execute more thorough assignments. Feedback will be given directly by the instructor and by the student’s peers in critiques. Towards the end of the semester, students will do a long-term narrative story based on a topic of their choice. By the end of the class, it is my hope that each student will create a narrative project that visually communicates an aspect of their experience abroad.

    The following will be covered throughout the course of the semester:

    -History of/contemporary trends in photojournalism

    -Story-telling via assignments and projects

    -Ethics and methods

    -Personal picture editing

    -Long Term Project planning and execution

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    Sexuality in Cultural Context

    Fall (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)

    In this course we examine how sexuality is shaped by culture, our families, and the societies in which we live. To better understand this, we explore public debates over sexual issues such as sex education, sex in the media, sex work, and LGBT rights, examining how other countries (particularly, but not only, Spain) address these issues from their own cultural perspective.

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    Sociology of Gender

    Fall (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)

    This course focuses on issues of and gender inequality, using the host country as a case study. Students apply the theories to the local people, issues and culture, looking for evidence to support or refute the theoretical perspectives presented, and to investigate the applicability of American perspectives on gender to other cultural contexts.

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    Spain Seen by Photography

    Fall (Art; 300-level; 3 credits)

    The aim of this course is to offer an introduction to the history of photography in Spain during the 19th and 20th centuries, which will be used to analyze the cultural background that defines Spanish society today. From the old monarchy of absolutist tradition to today’s democracy, photographers have captured in their negatives thousands of daily moments that help us to look again at history and understand the changes that define the Spanish culture. This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about the history and traditions of Spain through the lens of photography.

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    Spanish Composition I

    Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    This is a third year couse for students who have completed two years of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a short novel will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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    Spanish Composition II

    Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    Spanish Composition II (SPN 306) is a third year course of three credtis for students who have completed two years and a half of Spanish at the University level or their equivalent. The focus of the course is on improving the learners´ writing abilities with the analysis and the production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics will be reviewed in order to enhance and increase learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a novel or a collection of short stories will strengthen the formal instruction.

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    Spanish Conversation and Oral Skills

    Fall (300-level; 1 - 3 credits)
    Spring (300-level; 1 - 3 credits)

    An optional three credit course addressed to students that have already completed a year of Spanish at the elementary level and want to start participating in the oral activities that the immersion setting facilitates.

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    Spanish Cuisine

    Spring (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

    An introduction to Spanish cuisine in a hands-on kitchen environment. Authentic preparations of several local dishes will be taught. Correct cooking techniques are emphasized. Readings and lectures on local food customs and traditions will support and contextualize the cooking instruction.

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    Spanish Culture and Civilization

    Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

    This course will make the student gain a better understanding of modern Spain. Through the study of Spanish geography, recent history (20th and 21st centuries), its different regions, its traditions and the new changes faced by the society, students will picture the complexity and diversity of contemporary Spanish Culture and Civilization.

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    Spanish for Business

    Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    This course has been created for students who wish to develop competence in an area of Spanish which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. The objective of this course is to familiarize the student with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order that they be able to communicate correctly in this context.

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    Spanish for Medical Professionals

    Fall (Community Health Sciences, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    This course is designed for students who have an interest in the health field from the variety of its perspectives (medicine, public health, bioethics, medical humanities, psychology, heath law, politics etc.). It provides the student with language competence to allow communication in specific situations of medical activities in its different contexts. Moreover, there will be a strong focus on analyzing the Spanish health system and its current changes. It will also focus on the differences with the US health system, as well as the study of the cultural differences between these countries and between the Hispanic communities living in the US. There will be a focus on the current legislation of the Spanish public healthcare system, which will also be compared with other public systems. This course also provides the opportunity to prepare for Spanish certification on health science: Certificado Básico o Superior de Español de las Ciencias de la Salud, which is provided by the Chambers of commerce, Cámara de Comercio of Madrid.

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    Spanish Women Directors and Human Rights

    Spring (Anthropology, Sociology, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    Although women have been part of the development of world cinema since its inception, their impact has been silenced. Also, world cinema provides a valuable window into Women’s Rights and Human Rights as a whole. This course focuses on the fight for Human Rights that Spanish directors, such as Icíar Bollaín, have undertaken over the recent years.

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    Survey of Art I: European/Western Art

    Fall (Art; 200-level; 3 credits)

    This course studies the history of Western European Art from Prehistoric times to the Renaissance. The course has a general introduction and six main topics: Prehistoric Art, Egyptian and Western Asian Art, Classical, Roman Art, Gothic Art and arts evolution at the time of the Renaissance.

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    Survey of Art II: European/Western Art

    Spring (Art; 200-level; 3 credits)

    he aim of this course is to offer an introduction to Western Aesthetics analyzing forms and contents in different schools during a specific period of time: from the Baroque period (17th century) to the 20th century. The course will offer a general survey of Western Art and Architecture of the period with a particular emphasis on Art and Architecture on the Spanish Peninsula.

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    Survey of Spanish Literature I

    Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    A study of the development of Spanish literature through the analysis of literary movements and the comparison of the most important authors of each period from the 12th to 18th century. Texts from different literary genres are selected which demonstrate underlying ideas, idiosyncrasies of the Spanish people and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves.

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    Survey of Spanish Literature II

    Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    A través de una selección de textos, se estudiarán algunas de las obras más representativas de la literatura española, desde el siglo XVIII hasta la actualidad. Este estudio tendrá dos elementos básicos de análisis: contenido temático y formal.

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    The Hispanic World: Spain

    Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

    This course provides an overview of Spanish Culture and Civilization. In addition, the course aims to address contemporary resonances and current issues related to Spanish history.

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    Twentieth-Century and Contemporary European History and Cinema

    Fall (Art, Film, History; 300-level; 3 credits)

    The fundamental objective of this course is to examine the history of Twentieth Century Europe through the analysis and interpretation of a series of films that reconstruct key moments of this period. As the most influential artistic medium of the twentieth century, the cinema becomes both product and producer of historical processes and rhetoric, constructing and deconstructing myths, stories and identities. As such, studying cinema in a diachronic context allows us to examine the social, economic, historical, artistic and ideological movements related to a particular timeframe. We will simultaneously reflect on the connection between historiographic narratives and their corresponding on-screen versions. History as presented in film and the history of film.

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    Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish History and Cinema

    Spring (Art, Film, History; 300-level; 3 credits)

    The course explores the history of twentieth-century Spain through the study of selected texts and the analysis of relevant films of the period in Spanish culture and society. We will examine such questions as women´s roles, dictatorship and censorship, exile and migration, experience of war and repression, economic development, democracy, social movements and globalization, and how these issues are represented through cinema in Spain.

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    Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish Narrative

    Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 600-level; 3 credits)

    This course features several major novelists from the different cultural communities of Spain, who are regarded on both sides of the Atlantic as among the most representative of Spanish 20th century fiction. Their work is symptomatic of a whole 19th and 20th century project of inventing a novel, which represents a national form of fiction in Spain. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish

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    Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish Poetry

    Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
    Spring (Spanish; 600-level; 3 credits)

    A study of the most important authors and movements from the beginning of the 20th century to the present, including Unamuno, Garcia Lorca, Damaso Alonso, Cernuda, Celaya and more.

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    Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish Short Stories

    Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
    Fall (Spanish; 600-level; 3 credits)

    The objective of the course is to become familiar with the more outstanding short story writers and gain an appreciation for their most important literary works. You will read the best writers in Spain today, and you will learn to do a literary analysis of the works read. To facilitate your literary analysis, there will be a series of questions which review content and provide discussion and essay topics. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish.

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    Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish Theatre

    Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

    During this course some of the masters of Spanish theatre in the 20th and 21st centuries will be studied; their interrelationship with the European and American scene and their history-in-progress characteristics. Since theatre is, among other aspects, a reflection of the circumstances in which one writes, the analysis of the pre and post civil war theatre includes discussion of the most important events in the history of Spain during this century. Principal authors to be studied are Benavente, Garcia Lorca, Valle-Inclán, Buero Vallejo and Mayorga.

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