Alicante, Spain
USAC
1-866-404-USAC 1-775-784-6569 1-775-784-6010 studyabroad@usac.edu

Alicante Courses - 2019 Fall

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of a language track plus language and literature electives and/or courses in Spanish and European/Mediterranean studies. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Visiting Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professors are also teaching as Visiting Professors.

Fall Semester:

Instructor Eli Ronick | Portland State University

Courses offered:

Eli Ronick teaches Spanish at Portland State University. He has worked as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Eastern Oregon University and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Portland. Eli is passionate about Iberian and Latin American film. He lived in Spain for two years and recently interpreted for a health project to the Quiché region of Guatemala.

Spanish Language Tracks

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks in which courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in a track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it to be prepared for success at the next level. Language courses are small and typically have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Track I (14 credits total)—Prerequisite: none

Track II (12 credits total)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

Track III (9 credits total)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

Track III for Heritage Speakers (9 credits total)

Track IV (6 credits total)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in Spanish

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Spanish, European, and Mediterranean Studies Electives

Situated on the Mediterranean and home to the "Casa del Mediterráneo" a Government Institution that promotes the cooperation among the Mediterranean countries, and to the "OAMI", the European Union Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market for Trade Marks and Designs, Alicante is an ideal location to study Spanish, European, and Mediterranean studies.

Courses are taught in English unless noted in Spanish; courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III or above unless otherwise indicated.

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Host University Courses

Taught in Spanish

Advanced Spanish students may attend one course offered by the University of Alicante in the fields of Spanish Literature, History, Economics, Sociology, Tourism, or Biology. Spanish universities follow a different calendar, with final exams in February (fall semester) and June (spring semester). It may be possible to organize early exams (December and May) on an individual basis, but USAC cannot guarantee this.

Students with less advanced Spanish can enroll in one to three 1-credit workshops offered by the University of Alicante. Previous workshops offered include pottery, music, cinema, journalism, etc. Students will pay a $100 deposit for the first workshop, which will be refunded upon completion. Students are permitted to enroll in two or three workshops; however, only the first workshop fee is refundable. Students are required to pay for additional workshops (prices vary, around 40-80 EUR each).

Field Studies

Deepen your academic experience by turning the optional Madrid Tour into a one-credit field study by completing additional academic requirements (readings, research, written assignments, reports, etc.) on the historical, cultural, and natural features of the region. Students who enroll in these one-credit courses will keep a journal and answer a series of questions about the sites visited. The written work for the field study may be completed in Spanish or English.

Service Learning

Service learning is a particular type of course offering that combines the classroom with the community and academics with action. Prepare to make yourself a part of the city where you study in a way that most visitors cannot experience. It will call for some initiative and a willingness to become involved. Service Learning is a course and counts as part of your credit load. It cannot be taken for audit. Note that non-credit volunteer opportunities may also be available.

Internships

USAC internships are considered courses and count as part of your credit load. They can be time-consuming, but are rich resources for your academic and professional development. Students are placed in a Spanish-speaking environment, with high exposure to culture and language, and must be able to communicate at an advanced language level. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses.

Alicante internship opportunities fall into broad categories; Prior placements include: hotels, museums, movie studios, travel agencies, local schools, libraries, local businesses, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Other internship sites are possible. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview on site with the internship sponsor.

Eligibility: registration in Track IV, enrollment in the Alicante program, a minimum 3.0 GPA and junior standing at the time of the internship. USAC organizes the internships in close cooperation with the University of Alicante; the university charges 200 EUR for this service and for insurance. However, if the internship is related to teaching in a local school, this fee will not be charged.

Course Descriptions

Advanced Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

This advanced level course of Spanish has been designed for students who have completed three years of Spanish and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

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Advanced Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Advanced Spanish II has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of Spanish and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

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Advanced Translation

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Overview of main theories of translation. Extensive practice in translating literary and non-literary texts from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English. Prerequisite: five semesters of college Spanish.

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Applied Linguistics: Foreign Language Teaching Methodology

Spring (Education, Foreign Languages, Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

The goal of this course is to introduce the students into the principal didactic criteria and proposals to teach Spanish as a second language in primary and secondary school and in adult education. Students will be provided with a general introduction to the actual approaches and methods in communicative language teaching. This will include the theories of language and language learning that underlie these methods and their principal didactic fundamentals - the learning objectives, the syllabus design, the roles of teachers and learners in the classroom, the role of grammar, the materials, etc. This course will also focus on classroom techniques and practices dealing with the different communicative abilities in Spanish. This includes techniques to work listening comprehension, to stimulate oral interaction in the classroom, to help developing language learners' writing skills and to teach vocabulary and grammar. Different materials to teach Spanish at different levels will be analyzed.

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Economic and Political Institutions of the European Union

Fall (Economics, History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Economics, History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

The subject aims to analyze the past, present and future of European integration, on the basis of historic and economic reasoning. The process of European integration and its effects will be assessed taking into account differences in European Member States economies as well as considering the EU as a whole at the international level.

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Elementary Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish I is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Spanish courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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Elementary Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish II (SPN 112) is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have taken one course of Spanish at college-level or its equivalent before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence. It provides opportunities for the development of the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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Foreign Language Teaching Internship

Spring (400-level; 1 - 3 credits)

The goal of this course is to introduce the students into the principal didactic criteria and proposals to teach Spanish as a second language in primary and secondary school and in adult education. Students will be provided with a general introduction to the actual approaches and methods in communicative language teaching. This will include the theories of language and language learning that underlie these methods and their principal didactic fundamentals - the learning objectives, the syllabus design, the roles of teachers and learners in the classroom, the role of grammar, the materials, etc. This course will also focus on classroom techniques and practices dealing with the different communicative abilities in Spanish. This includes techniques to work listening comprehension, to stimulate oral interaction in the classroom, to help developing language learners' writing skills and to teach vocabulary and grammar. Different materials to teach Spanish at different levels will be analyzed.

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Gender and Gaze: Women Behind the Camera

Spring (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to provide a broad understanding of the issues of gender, the gaze, sexuality and identity through Hispanic (Spanish and Latin-American) film, art and photography.

This course will raise issues on gender, the gaze, visual and popular cultures, from the perspective and point of view of female Spanish artists, filmmakers and photographers such as Pilar Miró, Iciar Bollain, Isabel Coixet, Cristina García Rodero, Bárbara Allende (Ouka Lele), amongst others.

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Gender, Language and Power

Fall (Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)

The course intends to describe and analyze the ways language and its uses create, reinforce or question power relations and identities related to gender. Students will actively reflect on and react to texts, media products and discourse analysis and will be required to introduce or present some of the topics after the readings. We will explore examples of language in general and of visual language in particular from a variety of texts and contexts. To supplement publish research, students will reflect on their ideology on gender and consider it from a cross-cultural perspective.

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Government and Politics in Spain

Spring (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

A view of the actual political circumstances of the Spanish state. Particular attention is given to analyzing the post-Franco democratic process and the creation of autonomous communities. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish. (Spring semester)

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Hispanic Sociolinguistics and Multilingualism

Fall (Sociology, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course is an introduction to sociolinguistics, the study of the relationship between language and society. We will look at attitudes, values, beliefs and practices involving language.

The study of variation at all levels of language and how such variation constructs and is constructed by identity and culture is the content part of this course. We will also attempt to explore attitudes and ideologies surrounding these varieties, which will be of particular importance to understanding this relationship. Lastly, we will explore ways that these variations can affect issues like educational and language policies, specifically in the national linguistic landscape of Spain.

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History of Spain I: Up to the Twentieth-Century

Fall (History; 400-level; 3 credits)

The social, economic and political history of Spain from pre-history to the 20th century. The course will deal with pre-history, contact with Iberians, Romans and the special influence of the Arabs in the region. The course objectives are to understand the historic antecedents of our times. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish. (Fall semester)

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History of Spain II: Twentieth-Century

Spring (History; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to understand the key elements which have created the actual political, social and economic reality of present-day Spain. The course begins with a brief introduction of traditions and historic constants but focuses more on recent periods: industrialization, the Civil War in 1936, the Franco regime and the advent of democracy. The course will conclude by studying the different alternatives offered by political parties. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish. (Spring semester)

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Integrated Advanced Spanish I

Fall (Spanish, World Languages and Literatures; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish, World Languages and Literatures; 400-level; 3 credits)

The Advanced level course for foreign students of the Centro Superior de Idiomas of the University of Alicante corresponds to level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). Both the general objectives and the system of evaluation described below follow the general guidelines of the aforementioned European Framework and its scale of levels of competence. In order to be accepted into this class, you will need to pass the online placement test of the University of Alicante. Students will not be accepted into this class unless they pass this test. The course consists of 45 class hours.

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Integrated Advanced Spanish II

Fall (Spanish, World Languages and Literatures; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish, World Languages and Literatures; 400-level; 3 credits)

The Advanced II (Superior) level course for foreign students of the Centro Superior de Idiomas of the University of Alicante corresponds to level C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). Both the general objectives and the system of evaluation described below follow the general guidelines of the aforementioned European Framework and its scale of levels of competence. In order to be accepted into this class, you will need to pass the online placement test of the University of Alicante. Students will not be accepted into this class unless they pass this test. The course consists of 45 class hours.

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Intercultural Communication in Professional Contexts

Spring (English, Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Intermediate Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course emphasizes learning the structure of the Spanish language. Classes are divided into three components: grammar/vocabulary, conversation and reading/writing, each of which is related to the themes covered. A review of basic elements, such as the present tense, ser and estar, preterit and imperfect, etc. is included. Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish.

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Intermediate Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Spanish 212 (Intermediate II) is a course designed for students who have completed a year and a half of college Spanish or its equivalent and want to learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

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Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language. As such, the field—and this course—addresses broad questions such as “What does it mean to know a language?” and “What are the components (e.g., sounds, words) that make up a language, in this case, Spanish?” As we seek answers to these questions, we will discuss theoretical concepts as well as their application to more applied contexts and issues such as language learning and teaching.

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Latin American and Spanish Dances

Fall (Dance, Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Dance, Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)

There will be an introduction to the meaning and “spirit” of the dance, followed by the practice of the steps and movements without music and ending with the addition of music to the previously learned steps.

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Madrid Field Study

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to optimize the benefits of the Madrid tour by providing a solid historic and artistic base for studies of Spanish language and culture. The point of departure for the course will be the sites visited on the four-day tour of Madrid and surroundings. Requirements include pre-departure readings, a daily journal of the tour, completion of a comprehensive study guide and a final exam which will be given at the program site. The tour will be given in English. The written work may be done in English or Spanish and it must be handed in before the final exam. This course has an additional fee of $750 to help pay for transportation, entrance fees, guides, lodging and some meals.

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Professional Communication in an Intercultural Context

Fall (English, Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (English, Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)

Principles and practices that develop writing and communication skills for professional writing and document design for traditional and new media (letters of inquiry and application, resumes, email practices, social media PowerPoint etc.)

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Sailing

Fall (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)

This class is co-produced by USAC and “Real Club de Regatas de Alicante”. Students will take ten three-hour sessions where they will learn the key components of sailing with experienced teachers. In order to take full advantage of the mild weather conditions and water temperature all sailing sessions will take place during the warmer weather months of each semester, i.e. from September through October in the fall, and April through May in the spring. This means that class will sometimes meet two times a week. Also, the programmed order of sessions is subject to changes for reasons beyond our control, such as inclement weather, very big waves, strong rip currents, etc

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Service Learning

Fall (Service Learning, Social Work, Sociology; 400-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Service Learning, Social Work, Sociology; 400-level; 1 credit)

Service learning combines community service with academic instruction, focusing on critical, reflective thinking and personal and civic responsibility. Service learning programs involve students in activities that address community-identified needs, while developing their academic skills and commitment to their community.

Service learning differs from volunteerism, community service, internships, and field education through its use of structured, critical inquiry and the importance placed on reciprocal partnerships between this class and its community partners.

This class has partnered with the following community-based organizations: Ozanam (working with youngsters in risk of exclusion), Proyecto Paloma (working with women and immigrants), Colegio San José (working with handicapped children), Margarita Nasseau (working with orphans). Students will choose from among these organizations and will work with them over the course of the semester to experience first-hand insight into these organizations and the challenges they are facing.

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Spanish Civil War Film and Literature

Fall (Film / TV Production, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course will center on principally film and literature relating to the Spanish Civil War. As we watch films and read literature, we will learn about a variety of interpretations of collective memory, trauma, empathy, and reconciliation and how they help us to understand the Spanish Civil War and, generally, the past. Taught in English.

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Spanish Composition I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This is a third year couse for students who have completed two years of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a short novel will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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Spanish Composition II

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Composición Española II (SPN 306) es un curso de tres créditos de tercer año de español para alumnos que ya hayan completado dos años de español en la universidad o su equivalente. El peso del curso recae en mejorar las habilidades escritas de los estudiantes con el análisis y la producción de diferentes tipos de textos. Asimismo, se revisarán una serie de puntos gramaticales con objeto de ir ampliando y afinando la competencia gramatical de los alumnos. La lectura extensiva de una novela o colección de cuentos acompañará y hará de refuerzo de la instrucción recibida.

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Spanish Conversation and Oral Skills

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Optional three-credit course that complements the development of linguistic competences facilitated at the three-hundred level Spanish courses, focusing in the oral skills in particular.

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Spanish Cuisine and the Mediterranean Diet

Fall (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed to teach typical Spanish and Mediterranean recipes, as well as tips, serving ideas, and a bit of etiquette and customs. The lessons are arranged by meal, so that one can easily translate the lessons to real life cooking situations.

In addition to learning how to make appealing appetizers and entrees, students take several classes in baking and pastries. They learn tricks and tips that can be used in daily life. Students will spend time chopping onions, peeling potatoes, cutting meat, kneading dough and beating eggs, all of it under the supervision of the cooks who can teach them the tricks of the trade and correct any mistakes.

Generally, classes include one to two hours of explanations along with a practical hands-on component in the school (fully equipped and stocked kitchens where students cook).

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Spanish Culture and Civilization

Fall (Anthropology, Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

In this general civilization course, the customs and lifestyles of the Spanish will be studied, both in their historical perspectives as well as in the present. There is also a general discussion of the most important geographic, historical, social, economic, and artistic aspects of Spain, as well as of the most outstanding individuals in each area.

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Spanish for Business

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to enable students to develop competence in an area which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. You will become familiar with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order to enable you to communicate correctly in the target language. Business writing, correspondence, oral and written translation of business related material is also practiced. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish.

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Spanish Gender Studies

Fall (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course examines gender issues within a Spanish/Hispanic context, comparing and contrasting them with those that arise within the student’s own backgrounds. Students will evaluate and critically examine from varying disciplines what gendered representations are, as well as the importance of each individual to establish one’s identity within one’s own social, cultural and historical background.

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Spanish Grammar and Composition for Heritage Speakers I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to give native or heritage Spanish speakers the opportunity to study the conventions of the Spanish language and to improve their academic writing skills. It provides an overview of the local varieties of the language, emphasizing the idea that there are all equally acceptable and focusing on Spanish as a global language.

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Spanish Grammar and Composition for Heritage Speakers II

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to give native or heritage Spanish speakers the opportunity to study the conventions of the Spanish language and to improve their academic writing skills. It provides an overview of the local varieties of the language, emphasizing the idea that they are all equally acceptable, as well as focuses on Spanish as a global language.

The course is designed to build on the language base students already have and to develop more formal registers of Spanish through extensive reading of short stories and newspapers, as well as their composition of different types of essays.

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Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

El curso consiste en un estudio de las nociones fundamentales de fonética (el estudio de los sonidos del habla) y fonología (el estudio de los sistemas de sonidos de las lenguas), al mismo tiempo que describe las características fonéticas y fonológicas de la lengua española en sus variedades europeas y americanas. De igual modo, se consideran las variables dialectales, sociolingüísticas y estilísticas. Asimismo, a lo largo del curso se realizarán dos proyectos en los que poner en práctica la fundamentación teórica expuesta en las clases.

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Survey of Spanish Literature I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

A study of the development of Spanish literature through the analysis of literary movements and the comparison of the most important authors of each period from the 12th to 18th century. Texts from different literary genres are selected which demonstrate underlying ideas, idiosyncrasies of the Spanish people and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish. (Fall semester)

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Survey of Spanish Literature II

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish Poetry

Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Spanish Short Story

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objective of the course is to become familiar with the more outstanding short story writers and gain an appreciation for their most important literary works. You will read the best writers in Spain today, and you will learn to do a literary analysis of the works read. To facilitate your literary analysis, there will be a series of questions which review content and provide discussion and essay topics. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish.

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