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Viterbo Courses – 2020 Summer Session II

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You will enroll three to six credits per session, plus one additional credit if enrolled in the optional South of Italy Field Study. At least one 3-credit course is required each summer session. Course availability is contingent upon on student interest and enrollment and is subject to change.

Italian Language Studies

Summer language courses are intensive, with one to 4 credits of Italian taught in each five-week session. Language courses generally have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Session I and Session II

  • Summer Session I
    Italian100-level1 creditTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian100-level1 creditTaught in Italian

    The course objective is to enhance the period of study for participants with little or no knowledge of the target language (Italian). A working basic knowledge is provided, including a general introduction to common vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Emphasis is placed on oral communication and precise pronunciation. Class activities will consist of role playing, songs, games, and practical exercises. Additional activities such as language lab work and possible class visits to enhance the course topics may be scheduled.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

     Different Teaching Techniques And Strategies Will Be Used To Accommodate Different Learning Styles;

     There May Be More Emphasis On Skills Than Systems;

     Lessons Are More Learner-Centered, And Authentic Materials Will Be Used;

     Grammar Is Taught In A Communicative Way;

     The Classroom Atmosphere Will Be Positive, Encouraging, And Enjoyable In Order To Increase Students´ Motivation For The Learning Process;

     All In-Class Oral Activities, As Well As The Activities Carried Out By Students At Home In Preparation For The Oral Section Of The Exams, Encourage Team Work And Create An Environment Of Solidarity, Peer Exchange And Mutual Support.

    This course is for students not taking intensive Italian language. It is designed to help students assimilate into the community.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian100-level4 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian100-level4 creditsTaught in Italian

    Elementary Italian I is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Italian courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Italian to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing.

    The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential. Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language.

    As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

    • Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

    • There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

    • Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used; grammar is taught in a communicative way;

    • The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

    • All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian100-level4 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian100-level4 creditsTaught in Italian

    Elementary Italian II is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have already taken one Elementary Italian course before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Italian to improve their basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of the Italian language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

    Two field trips will be scheduled according to the local cultural events in order to discover some important and meaningful aspects of Italian culture and history.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach. The communicative approach is based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language.

    As a result, classroom activities are characterised by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels; different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

     There may be more emphasis on skills than systems; lessons are more learner-centred, and there may be use of authentic materials;

     Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

     The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

     All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

    Prerequisite: one semester of college Italian.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian200-level3 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian200-level3 creditsTaught in Italian

    Intermediate Italian I is a three-credit course for students who already have a solid foundation in the language. The course is intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

     Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

     There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

     Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

     Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

     The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

     All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college Italian.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian200-level3 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian200-level3 creditsTaught in Italian

    Intermediate Italian II is a three-credit course for students who already have a solid foundation in the language and want learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

     Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

     There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

     Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

     Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

     The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

     All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

    ) Prerequisite: three semesters of college Italian.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian300-level3 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian300-level3 creditsTaught in Italian

    Designed to continue expanding accuracy in writing Italian, this course covers advanced Italian grammar, syntax and idiomatic usage. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of literary texts (extracts from novels, short stories, etc) will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

     Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

     There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

     Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

     Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

     The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

     All in-class activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Italian.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian300-level3 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian300-level3 creditsTaught in Italian

    This course is designed to reinforce students' accuracy in writing Italian by introducing them to basic research concepts and techniques and emphasizing critical reading and the subsequent production of different types of texts. Assignments include critical examination of literature and compositions using research and documentation. Emphasis is on writing as part of the processes of thinking and learning (a foreign language and culture). In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of literary texts (extracts from novels, short stories, etc) will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

     Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

     There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

     Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

     Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

     The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

     All in-class activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

    Prerequisite: five semesters of college Italian.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian400-level3 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian400-level3 creditsTaught in Italian

    Advanced Italian I is a three-credit course for students who already have a solid foundation in the language and want learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

    Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

    Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles:

    There may be more emphasis on skills than systems

    Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used

    Grammar is taught in a communicative way

    The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process

    All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

    Prerequisite: six semesters of college Italian.

  • Summer Session I
    Italian400-level3 creditsTaught in Italian
    Summer Session II
    Italian400-level3 creditsTaught in Italian

    The objective of this class is to do a comprehensive revision of the most difficult grammatical points in Italian. This will be presented through the use of theoretical and practical materials that permit the student to consolidate some of those complex grammatical aspects of the Italian language that require frequent review and further development. Care will be taken, whenever possible, to focus on understanding and practicing their use in both the written and spoken forms of the language.

    Prerequisite: seven semesters of college Italian.

History and the Arts

Taught in English

The following courses offer a wide range of subject matter to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective to your studies.

Session I

  • Summer Session I
    ArtSpeech Communications300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    This is an introductory course that presents a selection of 20thcentury Italian Artists whose works we will see at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Rome. The student will be asked to perceive the works applying Rudolf Arnheim’s innovative theory on visual thinking, which means developing the ability to unite perception and reasoning so as to experience an informed and unbiased interaction with art. Thus while not being a course on aesthetics, art criticism, or art history per se the approach offered can be applied to expand upon notions surrounding art production and art appreciation in general.

  • Summer Session I
    Art100-level1 creditTaught in English
    Summer Session II
    Art100-level1 creditTaught in English

    This course is centered on the sketchbook as an instrument for developing drawing and painting techniques and for learning how to observe and understand visual information. Most classes will take place around the medieval city of Viterbo, with some visits to nearby towns. Students will use a variety of materials to document historic sites, building up a unique and personal record of the world around them. The course will involve no formal lectures; rather, students will receive individual instruction throughout on drawing and painting techniques and will be guided through the process of creating an informative and attractive sketchbook up to the development of a final artwork project based on themes studied in the sketchbook. Content will be an important factor and the course will place an emphasis on techniques of observation and concise capturing of information, as well as concentrating on the technical aspects of drawing and painting.

  • Summer Session I
    AnthropologyNutrition300-level3 creditsTaught in English
    Summer Session II
    AnthropologyNutrition300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Food is a topic with which every student of every ethnicity has personal experience; it is so common that its cultural connotations tend to be overlooked. Food is often related to identity, whether positive or negative, as well as one’s ancestry. Cuisines are not just about sustenance, but about cultural symbols that bind people together in ritual and as a community. How one participates in the act of eating, when/how/why certain foods are to be prepared are learned and understood at the table is the heart of this course. In the North American context, Thanksgiving has an established food tradition; there are similar established food-related traditions among other populations, such as the lunar new year, Easter or Day of the Dead.

    Food is of wide-ranging anthropological interest because, in eating, humans incorporate into our bodies the products of nature transformed into culture. This course explores connections between what we eat and who we are through cross-cultural study of how personal identities and social groups are formed via food production, preparation, and consumption.

    The course will initially explore the general topic of food and culture to present a background with which to discuss the specifics of identity and meaning. The role of food will be examined in a number of different communities. Documentaries and films will be used as an entrée to discussing specific topics, such as festivals/rituals and food as family/community; moreover, our topics and readings will be eclectic: food taboos, gender and kinship, voice and identity, symbolic and expressive culture, feasts, festivals, fasts, famine, religion and spirituality, race and ethnicity, nationalism, class and social stratification, politics of globalization, among others. Students will reflect on documentaries and films we watch together and in independent research for a class project.

  • Summer Session I
    HistoryItalian300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Prominent thinker in the fields of literary theory, moral and social philosophy, and political thought, Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) is considered the leading poet of the late Middle-Ages and pre-Renaissance. His most famous work, The Divine Comedy, is considered a literary landmark, a synthesis of his political, religious, and social views, as well as an encyclopedic summary of medieval culture.

    This course will examine some of the main historical items of Italian and European history in connection with Dante’s work. Guided trips within the city of Viterbo and other places are will be part of this course and a stimulation to students to encourage them to take full advantage of their Italian cultural experience of study.

    This course will analyze the definition of “Middle-Ages” as a historical period and cultural phenomenon, giving students the ability to establish or recognize connections between past and contemporary events in terms of society, culture, language, aesthetics, and politics. The course will also offer students the opportunity to improve their skills in reading and analyzing historical and literary sources and to develop skills to talk and present their studies.

  • Summer Session I
    Nutrition200-level1 creditTaught in English
    Summer Session II
    Nutrition200-level1 creditTaught in English

    The course includes a cooking workshop where students will put in practice the theory acquired by preparing different dishes, using and combining different ingredients in order to comply with specific dietary needs and/or restrictions, learning more about regional differences and tasting freshly prepared real Mediterranean and Italian food. This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to understand the culture and understanding the culture is a way to better appreciate the cooking. It has both a theoretical and a practical side.

    Not recommended for students on a gluten-free diet.

    This course has an additional fee for materials.

  • Summer Session I
    Geography300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Examines geographic approaches to Europe and its relations with the world. It is a critical thinking approach to contemporary Europe, defined as the European Union and prospective member states. The approach is not to take each European country or institution in isolation, but rather to survey regional trends and the political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental challenges facing European populations. The course content focuses on key issues and enduring conflicts linking territory, identity, and mobility across spatial scales. As a whole, it is approached using the ‘big questions’ grounded by contemporary news reports from European subregions using local news sources. Students will learn methods of cultural and political geographers – through observation, mapmaking, data gathering and writing – students will learn how to employ spatial concepts and landscape interpretation to locations and situations around Europe, and particularly in Italy.

    This course has an additional fee.

  • Summer Session I
    Art300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Photographers, like any other artists, have the responsibility of mediating reality for those who will view their pictures. Travel photography is the quintessential mediation of reality, since people looking at a travel reportage will probably never get to visit the places depicted. The job of travel photographers is then to show their own impressions of a place, representing what caught their attention and what they deemed important, rather than showing famous landmarks.

    This course will help you to capture memories, learn to tell a story with images, and give your own impression of a place through photographic expression. In particular, the course will go through the basics of exposure management, getting to know the main features of your camera, managing studio lighting, and understanding composition. The course will also go through the work of the masters of travel photography to encourage students to find their own style of visual expression.

Session II

  • Summer Session I
    Art100-level1 creditTaught in English
    Summer Session II
    Art100-level1 creditTaught in English

    This course is centered on the sketchbook as an instrument for developing drawing and painting techniques and for learning how to observe and understand visual information. Most classes will take place around the medieval city of Viterbo, with some visits to nearby towns. Students will use a variety of materials to document historic sites, building up a unique and personal record of the world around them. The course will involve no formal lectures; rather, students will receive individual instruction throughout on drawing and painting techniques and will be guided through the process of creating an informative and attractive sketchbook up to the development of a final artwork project based on themes studied in the sketchbook. Content will be an important factor and the course will place an emphasis on techniques of observation and concise capturing of information, as well as concentrating on the technical aspects of drawing and painting.

  • Summer Session I
    AnthropologyNutrition300-level3 creditsTaught in English
    Summer Session II
    AnthropologyNutrition300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Food is a topic with which every student of every ethnicity has personal experience; it is so common that its cultural connotations tend to be overlooked. Food is often related to identity, whether positive or negative, as well as one’s ancestry. Cuisines are not just about sustenance, but about cultural symbols that bind people together in ritual and as a community. How one participates in the act of eating, when/how/why certain foods are to be prepared are learned and understood at the table is the heart of this course. In the North American context, Thanksgiving has an established food tradition; there are similar established food-related traditions among other populations, such as the lunar new year, Easter or Day of the Dead.

    Food is of wide-ranging anthropological interest because, in eating, humans incorporate into our bodies the products of nature transformed into culture. This course explores connections between what we eat and who we are through cross-cultural study of how personal identities and social groups are formed via food production, preparation, and consumption.

    The course will initially explore the general topic of food and culture to present a background with which to discuss the specifics of identity and meaning. The role of food will be examined in a number of different communities. Documentaries and films will be used as an entrée to discussing specific topics, such as festivals/rituals and food as family/community; moreover, our topics and readings will be eclectic: food taboos, gender and kinship, voice and identity, symbolic and expressive culture, feasts, festivals, fasts, famine, religion and spirituality, race and ethnicity, nationalism, class and social stratification, politics of globalization, among others. Students will reflect on documentaries and films we watch together and in independent research for a class project.

  • Summer Session II
    ArtHistoric PreservationJournalism300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    This course analyzes the visual paths that created our collective identity through the study of the "culture of the gaze" (Western), to finally arrive to the historical moment in which we live, strongly marked by the images. Each image, without distinction, is in respect of the memory more effective than the word, making it a fundamental tool for the documentation of cultural assets.

    Documentary photography serves to preserve the memory of an object and make it visible, even in its absence. The photographer has the task of having to create documents that represent in a fair and objective way the cultural assets. Students will analyze, research, and study monuments – mainly but not limited to sculpture and architecture – learning its history, style, origin, author(s) and learning concepts of restoration.

    Required materials: A digital camera that allows full manual control of the functions (all DSRL or mirrorless models) with wide-angle and normal lens, and a basic laptop with image software processing (like photoshop, camera raw, lightroom, etc).

  • Summer Session I
    Nutrition200-level1 creditTaught in English
    Summer Session II
    Nutrition200-level1 creditTaught in English

    The course includes a cooking workshop where students will put in practice the theory acquired by preparing different dishes, using and combining different ingredients in order to comply with specific dietary needs and/or restrictions, learning more about regional differences and tasting freshly prepared real Mediterranean and Italian food. This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to understand the culture and understanding the culture is a way to better appreciate the cooking. It has both a theoretical and a practical side.

    Not recommended for students on a gluten-free diet.

    This course has an additional fee for materials.

  • Summer Session II
    ArtGeneral Humanities And Social SciencesHistory300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    This course explores the fundamental concepts of arts in the Italian Renaissance (14th – 16th century, from early Humanism to Mannerism), in order to furnish the tools to interpret the practice of painting, sculpture, architecture, music, theater, and poetry of that period. Specific attention is given to the evolution of the relationship between art and nature, its heritage in Western culture, and its relation to technology and environmental issues today. Students are given the opportunity to study significant Renaissance masterpieces in class and in sites, such as Viterbo, Rome, and Caprarola. This course will provide students with the opportunity to experience the spirit, creation, and reception of arts in the Italian renaissance, as well as reflect on their influence on today’s practices of the arts.

  • Summer Session II
    EnglishJournalism300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    In this creative writing workshop, we will write and share short nonfiction pieces about our experiences abroad. Our writing topics will be borrowed from the old definition of a noun; we will write about Italian people, places, things, and ideas. To help us discuss the various forms and styles of travel writing, I will provide short excerpts from a variety of famous travel writers, both classic and contemporary. In addition to traditional print travel writing, you may choose (though it’s not required) to create a photographic essay, a short film, or some other piece supported by new media. Together we will create an electronic anthology of our favorite pieces produced in the class—our “publication.”

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

Internships

Viterbo internship opportunities fall into broad categories; possible placements include: translating materials and writing articles for a local tourist website or a teaching practicum in which students are placed in local kindergarten schools teaching English as a Second Language. Depending on the level of Italian language at the beginning of the internship, the student will be working in an English or Italian speaking environment with high exposure to Italian culture and language. Proficiency in Italian is not required for the teaching practicum; the activity in class is supervised and monitored by the Italian teachers and conversation is done in English. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview on site with the internship sponsor.

Eligibility: Enrollment in both sessions of the USAC Viterbo summer program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, and junior standing at the time of internship. A refundable fee of $200 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

Quick Details

2020-21 App. Cycle

Fall: Cancelled

Spring: Open

2021-22 App. Cycle

Summer programs: Opens 9/1

Fall/Yearlong: Opens 9/1

Spring: Opens 9/1

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

US Credit

Program Capacity

60 students

Instruction

English | Italian

Member

AACUPI--Association of American Colleges and Universities in Italy

Passport & Visa

Passport & Visa Information