Viterbo, Italy
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Viterbo, Italy | 2017 Summer Session II

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You will enroll three to six credits per session, plus one additional credit if enrolled in the optional South of Italy Field Study. At least one 3-credit course is required each summer session. Course availability is contingent upon on student interest and enrollment and is subject to change. Please visit the USAC website for complete course descriptions and prerequisites.

Italian Language Studies

Summer language courses are intensive, with one to 4 credits of Italian taught in each five-week session. Language courses generally have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Session I and Session II

History, Art, Photography, Journalism, Mediterranean, and Italian Studies

Taught in English

The following courses offer a wide range of subject matter to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective to your studies.

Session I

Session II

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.unr.edu

Field studies

Deepen your academic experience through the optional South of Italy field study course, offered between the two summer sessions, which helps you explore the historical, cultural, and natural features of the region. Students who enroll in this 1-credit course will select a particular topic of interest to examine as part of the Field Study, and complete a research paper drawing from their field study experience as well as from additional readings, research, and written assignments.

Internships

Viterbo internship opportunities fall into broad categories; possible placements include: translating materials and writing articles for a local tourist website or a teaching practicum in which students are placed in local kindergarten schools teaching English as a Second Language. Depending on the level of Italian language at the beginning of the internship, the student will be working in an English or Italian speaking environment with high exposure to Italian culture and language. Proficiency in Italian is not required for the teaching practicum; the activity in class is supervised and monitored by the Italian teachers and conversation is done in English. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview on site with the internship sponsor.

Eligibility: Enrollment in both sessions of the USAC Viterbo summer program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, and junior standing at the time of internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

U.S. Professors

Most USAC courses are taught by local faculty; however, the following professors are also teaching as Visiting Professors.

Session I

Prof. Sayantani Dasgupta, University of Idaho

Course offered:

With graduate degrees in History & English, Professor Dasgupta has taught a wide variety of courses at the University of Idaho. She is author of two books—The House of Nails and Oscillation— and serves as the nonfiction editor of Crab Creek Review. Honors include a Centrum Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize Special Mention & Dukool Magazine's 2016 Prize for Creative Fiction.

Session II

Prof. Sean Green, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Course offered:

Professor Green, a California native, earned his B.A. in History and Economics at UCLA and MFA in Creative Writing at Louisiana State University. Always on the lookout for adventure, Sean has taught high school in South Korea, led community-building workshops in Algeria, and wandered aimfully across five continents, all while squeezing in just enough time to complete his first novel.

Course Descriptions

Advanced Italian I

Summer Session I (Italian; 400-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 400-level; 3 credits)

Advanced Italian I is a three-credit course for students who already have a solid foundation in the language and want learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

 Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

 There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

 Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

 Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

 The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

 All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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Advanced Italian II

Summer Session I (Italian; 400-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this class is to do a comprehensive revision of the most difficult grammatical points in Italian. This will be presented through the use of theoretical and practical materials that permit the student to consolidate some of those complex grammatical aspects of the Italian language that require frequent review and further development. Care will be taken, whenever possible, to focus on understanding and practicing their use in both the written and spoken forms of the language. Prerequisite: seven semesters of college Italian.

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Drawing and Painting Italy I

Summer Session I (100-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (100-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical experience of art. Students will need to work outside the classroom, as well as in class. This course is designed to generate competence in individual aesthetic style. The interrelation of painting and drawing with other media and disciplines will also be encouraged and issues on the interpretation of drawing and painting will be addressed. Taught in English.

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Elementary Italian I

Summer Session I (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Italian I is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Italian courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Italian to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing.

The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential. Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language.

As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

• Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

• There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

• Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used; grammar is taught in a communicative way;

• The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

• All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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Elementary Italian II

Summer Session I (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Italian II is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have already taken one Elementary Italian course before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Italian to improve their basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of the Italian language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

Two field trips will be scheduled according to the local cultural events in order to discover some important and meaningful aspects of Italian culture and history.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach. The communicative approach is based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language.

As a result, classroom activities are characterised by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels; different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

 There may be more emphasis on skills than systems; lessons are more learner-centred, and there may be use of authentic materials;

 Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

 The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

 All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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History of Medieval Italy: The World of Dante

Summer Session I (History, Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course will examine the main historical events of the age in connection with the Dante’s life and his Divine Comedy. Guided trips within the city of Viterbo and other medieval cities will breathe life in what students are learning and encourage them to take full advantage of their Italian experience.

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Intermediate Italian I

Summer Session I (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermediate Italian I is a three-credit course for students who already have a solid foundation in the language. The course is intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

 Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

 There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

 Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

 Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

 The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

 All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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Intermediate Italian II

Summer Session I (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermediate Italian II is a three-credit course for students who already have a solid foundation in the language and want learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

 Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

 There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

 Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

 Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

 The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

 All in-class oral activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the oral section of the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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Introduction to Italian Language I

Summer Session I (Italian; 100-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (Italian; 100-level; 1 credit)

The course objective is to enhance the period of study for participants with little or no knowledge of the target language (Italian). A working basic knowledge is provided, including a general introduction to common vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Emphasis is placed on oral communication and precise pronunciation. Class activities will consist of role playing, songs, games, and practical exercises. Additional activities such as language lab work and possible class visits to enhance the course topics may be scheduled.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

 Different Teaching Techniques And Strategies Will Be Used To Accommodate Different Learning Styles;

 There May Be More Emphasis On Skills Than Systems;

 Lessons Are More Learner-Centered, And Authentic Materials Will Be Used;

 Grammar Is Taught In A Communicative Way;

 The Classroom Atmosphere Will Be Positive, Encouraging, And Enjoyable In Order To Increase Students´ Motivation For The Learning Process;

 All In-Class Oral Activities, As Well As The Activities Carried Out By Students At Home In Preparation For The Oral Section Of The Exams, Encourage Team Work And Create An Environment Of Solidarity, Peer Exchange And Mutual Support.

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Italian Composition I

Summer Session I (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

Designed to continue expanding accuracy in writing Italian, this course covers advanced Italian grammar, syntax and idiomatic usage. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of literary texts (extracts from novels, short stories, etc) will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

 Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

 There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

 Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

 Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

 The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

 All in-class activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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Italian Composition II

Summer Session I (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to reinforce students' accuracy in writing Italian by introducing them to basic research concepts and techniques and emphasizing critical reading and the subsequent production of different types of texts. Assignments include critical examination of literature and compositions using research and documentation. Emphasis is on writing as part of the processes of thinking and learning (a foreign language and culture). In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of literary texts (extracts from novels, short stories, etc) will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

Classroom activities are guided by the communicative approach based on the idea that learning language successfully comes through having to communicate real meaning. When learners are involved in real communication, their natural strategies for language acquisition will be used, and this will allow them to learn to use the language. As a result classroom activities are characterized by trying to produce meaningful and real communication, at all levels;

 Different teaching techniques and strategies will be used to accommodate different learning styles;

 There may be more emphasis on skills than systems;

 Lessons are more learner-centered, and authentic materials will be used;

 Grammar is taught in a communicative way;

 The classroom atmosphere will be positive, encouraging, and enjoyable in order to increase students´ motivation for the learning process;

 All in-class activities, as well as the activities carried out by students at home in preparation for the exams, encourage team work and create an environment of solidarity, peer exchange and mutual support.

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Italian Cuisine

Summer Session I (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

The course includes a cooking workshop where students will put in practice the theory acquired by preparing different dishes, using and combining different ingredients in order to comply with specific dietary needs and/or restrictions, learning more about regional differences and tasting freshly prepared real Mediterranean and Italian food. This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to understand the culture and understanding the culture is a way to better appreciate the cooking. It has both a theoretical and a practical side.

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Italian Hill Towns: History through Urban Form

Summer Session I (Architecture, Art, History; 300-level; 3 credits)

The splendid hill towns of Italy will be the focus and actual setting for this course. Students are introduced to the development of town-form in Italy from the Roman times through the Medieval and Renaissance periods, by visiting and studying towns and their architecture of walls, towers, piazzas, abbeys and palaces. From Viterbo we will visit towns noteworthy for their rich architectural and historical sites, and experience how these unique towns are lived in today. Visits may include the towns of Orvieto, Siena, Pienza among others. There is a fee of $200 in order to help defray costs of excursions.

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Italian Renaissance Arts

Summer Session II (Art, General Humanities And Social Sciences; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course will explore some of the most relevant works and the main ideas at the basis of the art, architecture, music, theater, and literature that contributed to create the civilization of Italian Renaissance – works and ideas that influenced the future development of Western culture. Architecture, sculptures, paintings, literary woks, music and theatrical performances will be also considered in their historical context for a period that covers from 1348 until the end of 1500, from early Humanism to Mannerism. Students will have the opportunity to see several Renaissance artistic works or the locations of their performances during our and their visits in cities like Rome, Florence, Perugia, Siena, as well as in Viterbo.

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Narrating the Globe: Creative Nonfiction

Summer Session II (English, History; 400-level; 3 credits)

While the art and practice of writing creative nonfiction (the memoir, the nature essay, the personal narrative, cultural criticism, literary journalism, etc.) is nothing new, the experiences of each individual are never the same. Through the lens of international traveler, students in this class will learn to embrace these inevitable differences yet, at the same time, seek out universal truths that make the individualized experience worth retelling.

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People, Places, and Landscape: Cultural Geographies of Europe

Summer Session I (Anthropology, Geography; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of Human Geography. Students will learn, or develop pre-acquired skills, to reflect upon cultural diversity, landscape development, environmental change and degradation, globalization and overpopulation to name a few. By using the methods of geographers – observation, mapmaking, data gathering and technical writing – students will learn how to employ spatial concepts and landscape interpretation to locations and situations around Europe with a focus to the Italian scenario. Via fieldtrips and direct observations exercises, students will have a better comprehension of how the Italian map and more specifically regional areas are defined within the European framework.

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South of Italy Field Study

Summer Session I (Italian; 200-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (Italian; 200-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to optimize the benefits of the tour while serving as a complementary activity to the regular academic courses by providing a solid historic and artistic base for studies of Italian culture, art and architecture. The point of departure for the course will be the sites visited on the four-day tour: Sorrento, Napoli, Pompei, Amalfi and Caserta. Requirements include pre-departure readings, a daily journal of the tour (which depending on the course that each student chooses to apply the credit to may contain short essays, drawings and sketches, photographs), completion of a comprehensive study guide.

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The Mediterranean and Italian Coastline Environment

Summer Session II (Environmental Science, Geography; 400-level; 3 credits)

This class will explore the environmental features of the Mediterranean landscape, analyzing the natural as well the cultural factors which have shaped it throughout its history. We will start with a description of the environmental drivers of the diversity in Mediterranean landscapes by studying the control of climate and geography over the features of the Mediterranean environment as it changes moving from the coastline to the inner mountain chains. This will lead to a discussion of the distinctive traits of the vegetation of the Mediterranean region in contrast with the patches created by land use. We will study the concept of biodiversity and its extent in the Mediterranean landscape, we will analyze human impact on natural environments and study the key points for conservation of natural resources and typical landscapes in the Mediterranean basin. The final part will put together all the information acquired to discuss about the conservation of the Mediterranean landscape under the threats of the current global change and human pressure. The ecology of the Mediterranean natural components will be discussed and displayed also during fieldtrips to various sites in the surroundings of Viterbo (Capalbio, Uccellina Regional Park, Tarquinia salt marshes, etc).

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To Italy & Beyond: A Course on Travel Writing

Summer Session I (English; 300-level; 3 credits)

To Italy & Beyond: A Course on Travel Writing With its focus on Italy, this course will examine the full spectrum of travel writing—articles, blogs, guidebooks, essays, short stories, memoir, and novel. Reading materials will include selections from diverse local and international writers such as Italo Calvino, Barbara Grizzuti Harrison, Bill Bryson, and Anthony Doerr. There will be daily writing assignments for which students will draw on their experiences both home and abroad and seek inspiration from the local landscape.

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Travel Photography

Summer Session I (Art, Journalism; 300-level; 3 credits)

A camera is really an excuse to delve deeper into a place than we otherwise would. Looking for a good shot forces us to seek out the unique features and scenic beauty of a location, to explore further, and to interact with our surroundings. Taking pictures is also a very accessible art form. With a little thought and effort, you can create captivating images of your own creation and interpretation. This course will help you in capturing memories, telling a story and expressing a sense of place. In particular the course will go through the basics of exposure, lighting and composition as well as finding your own style in visual communication and expression.

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