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Torino Courses – 2022-23 Yearlong

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

Students may enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of Italian language plus electives in business, international management, politics, and cultural studies. At least one Italian language course is required. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Click the course title to view course details, description, and availability.

Italian Language Studies (Both Semesters)

All students are required to spend the beginning of the fall and spring semesters taking an intensive six-week Italian language course, which allows for rapid acquisition of language and culture. Language courses generally have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each, but may vary by level. All language courses focus on the skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. The following courses are offered during the intensive period:

  • Fall
    Italian 100-level 4 credits Taught in Italian
    Spring
    Italian 100-level 4 credits Taught in Italian

    This course is designed to help learners of Italian develop basic communicative competence and critical thinking skills. It offers an intensive study and practice of the productive and receptive language skills in the oral and written modes.

  • Fall
    Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in Italian
    Spring
    Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in Italian

    Students will learn to narrate in the main timeframes and use the subjunctive mood in the correct contexts. This course will focus on writing, familiarizing the student with the conventions of different types of written genres, such as descriptions, narrations in emails, blogs or journal articles, formal and informal letters, and expository academic essays.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level Italian

  • Fall
    Italian 300-level 3 credits Taught in Italian
    Spring
    Italian 300-level 3 credits Taught in Italian

    The focus of this course is to improve learners´ written abilities through the analysis and the production of different types of texts. In addition, several grammatical topics will be reviewed to enhance and refine the learners´ grammatical competence.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Italian, or equivalent

  • Fall
    Italian 300-level 3 credits Taught in Italian Cancelled
    Spring
    Italian 300-level 3 credits Taught in Italian

    In this course, students will develop the skills to communicate with native Italian speakers in day-to-day conversations and learn how to appropriately respond with complex vocabulary.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level Italian

After the intensive period, semester students have the option to take one additional language course. You may choose from the following:

  • Fall
    Italian 100-level 4 credits Taught in Italian
    Spring
    Italian 100-level 4 credits Taught in Italian

    This course is designed to help learners of Italian develop basic communicative competence and critical thinking skills. It offers an intensive study and practice of the productive and receptive language skills in the oral and written modes. The main emphasis of this course is on communication

    Prerequisite: one semester of college-level Italian

  • Fall
    Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in Italian
    Spring
    Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in Italian

    Students will learn to narrate in the main timeframes and use the subjunctive mood in the correct contexts. This course will focus on writing, familiarizing the student with the conventions of different types of written genres, such as descriptions, narrations in emails, blogs or journal articles, formal and informal letters, and expository academic essays.

    Prerequisite: three semesters of college-level Italian

  • Fall
    Italian 300-level 3 credits Taught in Italian
    Spring
    Italian 300-level 3 credits Taught in Italian

    The focus of this course is to improve learners´ written abilities through the analysis and the production of different types of texts. In addition, several grammatical topics will be reviewed to enhance and refine the learners´ grammatical competence.

    Prerequisite: five semesters of college Italian, or equivalent

    Fall Semester

    International Business, Politics, Architecture, and Italian Studies

    • Fall
      General Business Law 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      Globalization offers our world new opportunities but challenges business, international trade, and people’s welfare in developing and developed countries. New rules are gradually being shaped to direct this worldwide process toward sustainable development and increasing the well-being of people; frequently, however, their practical impact is not as strong as envisaged. This course highlights these challenges, rules, and critical aspects. Students will predominantly discuss examples of ethical dilemmas, international laws, practical experiences, and cases.

    • Fall
      General Business Management 400-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      General Business Management 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The course presents leadership, management and teamwork concepts/models that have emerged over the past years. It is conceived as a behavioral course, aiming to challenge students to apply these concepts/models through class exercises, simulations, role-plays, etc. in a dynamic and participative way.

      Prerequisite: introductory course in business

    • Fall
      Economics History Political Science 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Economics History Political Science 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The creation of the European Union will go down in history as one of the most remarkable achievements of the twentieth century. In less than two generations, Europeans fought two appalling wars among themselves, appreciated the dangers of nationalism and sat down to design a system that would make inconceivable that they would ever take up arms against each other again. A body of laws and treaties has been agreed and a set of institutions has been created that have altered the political, economic and social landscape of western Europe. The main objective of this class is to gain understanding on how European Union works and about what it means for the millions of people who live under its jurisdiction. Our goal is to provide students with fair understandings of concept of the European market integration within the present framework of globalization, trade liberalization and regionalism.

    • Fall
      Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to build and maintain positive communication and relationships across cultures. Students will explore the definitions, nature and manifestation of culture while examining their own values, traditions and beliefs.This course offers an introduction to the major issues related to intercultural communication. The course aims at providing students with an understanding of the intercultural communication process and to develop the skills necessary to analyze intercultural interactions, including evaluations of their own communicatory behaviour in intercultural settings.

    • Fall
      Political Science 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The concept of human rights, since the end of World War II, has become an integral part of modern consciousness and dominates the narrative in both foreign and national policymaking. Human rights norms and institutions deeply inform the practice as well as the rhetoric of international law and politics. This course will cover topics in international law, and encourage students analyse the architecture, powers, functions, and processes of international human rights organizations. Students are encouraged to discuss topics such as free speech, right to education, discrimination against ethnic minorities, and right to healthcare.

    • Fall
      Art Film Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Art Film Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This film course serves as a key to understanding Italian society through a wide-ranging historical look at Italian cinema. The course introduces the history of Italian film and its major genres, studies the relationship of film to literature and the performing arts, and examines films currently released in the commercial and the film festival circuits. Torino, birthplace of Italian cinema, is the ideal site for the course – also for the National Cinema Museum.

    • Fall
      Nutrition 200-level 1 credit Taught in English
      Spring
      Nutrition 200-level 1 credit Taught in English

      Students are given the opportunity to learn, observe and participate first-hand in the art of preparing Italian foods, as well as to study the relationship between food and culture. USAC provides instruction and facilities for this cooking class. This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to learn the culture, and learning the culture is a way to better appreciate the cooking. As such, the course has both a theoretical and a practical side. An introductory lecture is needed to understand Italian cooking. Its peculiarity is highlighted by a knowledge of history, geography and other social customs; knowing these allows the students to better appreciate this rich aspect of Italian life.

      The course will include actual cooking and learning how to prepare Italian meals: antipasti, first courses, second courses with vegetable side dishes, desserts - and of course, how to make a good pizza. After learning how to prepare each meal, the class will enjoy eating the meal together.

      This course has an additional fee for materials.

    • Fall
      Anthropology Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Anthropology Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This course analyzes various aspects of Italian culture through lectures, readings, discussions, and observation research projects. Students will develop an understanding of contemporary Italy, encompassing its recent history, regional differences, social institutions, and contemporary issues. Students will also reflect on their cultural upbringings and beliefs, and to share their Italian culture experiences in class. Students are encouraged to break down commonly held stereotypes and experience the realities of contemporary Italian life.

    • Fall
      Marketing 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This course on Marketing Principles is designed to teach you the fundamental concepts involved in the marketing function of modern organizations. The focus is on surveying the range of concepts and issues in the marketing of products and services to consumers. This is done in two steps: first, you are taught how to understand the marketing environment (MARKET ANALYSIS), and then you are taught how to implement successful marketing strategies in such an environment (MARKETING STRATEGY). The course is based on a combination of lectures/discussions, business cases, videos, outside speakers, company visits, country snapshots and a final marketing project in which student teams introduce a product or service into the Italian market.

    • Fall
      Architecture Art 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Architecture Art 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The course intends to provide all students with an introduction to contemporary architecture, with special interest in the contemporary city. It will focus on the major trends, events, key figures and works in architectural and urban history. Major architectural and urban trends and perspectives will be discussed on an international scale, from the late 19th century to the present.

      Lectures and class discussions will provide the framework of the course. Walking tours and visits to selected parts of the city will be scheduled. Selected readings will be assigned in advance, in view of the lectures and visits. Two in-class tests will be scheduled on the topics of the architectural lectures and of the visits, to make the discussion fruitful. Additional assignments may be announced at the discretion of the professor.

    • Fall
      Management 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Management 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      In this course, students will learn the concepts and techniques of operations management across all activities of an organization. This course covers topics related to methods of analyses that support organizational decision-making. Students will evaluate and apply the appropriate analytical technique for a variety of scenarios, perform quantitative analyses utilizing primary sources, and develop conclusions regarding effective management of operations in manufacturing and service environments.

      Prerequisite: introductory coursework in business management

    Spring Semester

    International Business, Politics, Architecture, and Italian Studies

    • Fall
      General Business Management 400-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      General Business Management 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The course presents leadership, management and teamwork concepts/models that have emerged over the past years. It is conceived as a behavioral course, aiming to challenge students to apply these concepts/models through class exercises, simulations, role-plays, etc. in a dynamic and participative way.

      Prerequisite: introductory course in business

    • Spring
      Political Science 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This introductory course offers an overview of the concepts and methods that allow for the systematic comparison of political phenomena across countries, including government structures, political institutions, ideologies, parties and party systems, elections, and political behavior. Using six case studies -Mexico, Italy, UK, Iran, Russia, and Nigeria- will allow students to examine in depth the political life of each of these countries.

    • Fall
      Economics History Political Science 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Economics History Political Science 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The creation of the European Union will go down in history as one of the most remarkable achievements of the twentieth century. In less than two generations, Europeans fought two appalling wars among themselves, appreciated the dangers of nationalism and sat down to design a system that would make inconceivable that they would ever take up arms against each other again. A body of laws and treaties has been agreed and a set of institutions has been created that have altered the political, economic and social landscape of western Europe. The main objective of this class is to gain understanding on how European Union works and about what it means for the millions of people who live under its jurisdiction. Our goal is to provide students with fair understandings of concept of the European market integration within the present framework of globalization, trade liberalization and regionalism.

    • Spring
      Management 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This course exposes students to the study and practice of Human Resource Management. The goal is to provide a conceptual and practical understanding of the HRM function and its importance to the effectiveness on an organization. Theoretical concepts and practical approaches relevant to the management systems and processes; recruitment, training, appraisal, compensation and labor relations will be analyzed as well as emphasis on legal constraints and international management.

    • Fall
      Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to build and maintain positive communication and relationships across cultures. Students will explore the definitions, nature and manifestation of culture while examining their own values, traditions and beliefs.This course offers an introduction to the major issues related to intercultural communication. The course aims at providing students with an understanding of the intercultural communication process and to develop the skills necessary to analyze intercultural interactions, including evaluations of their own communicatory behaviour in intercultural settings.

    • Spring
      International Business Marketing 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The course is designed to enable students to develop marketing strategies and plans in and across a range of different international market environments. While extending students' marketing and strategic skills obtained in earlier courses into a global context, students also develop knowledge and skills in international marketing processes.

      Prerequisite: one semester of college-level marketing or business administration

    • Fall
      Art Film Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Art Film Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This film course serves as a key to understanding Italian society through a wide-ranging historical look at Italian cinema. The course introduces the history of Italian film and its major genres, studies the relationship of film to literature and the performing arts, and examines films currently released in the commercial and the film festival circuits. Torino, birthplace of Italian cinema, is the ideal site for the course – also for the National Cinema Museum.

    • Fall
      Nutrition 200-level 1 credit Taught in English
      Spring
      Nutrition 200-level 1 credit Taught in English

      Students are given the opportunity to learn, observe and participate first-hand in the art of preparing Italian foods, as well as to study the relationship between food and culture. USAC provides instruction and facilities for this cooking class. This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to learn the culture, and learning the culture is a way to better appreciate the cooking. As such, the course has both a theoretical and a practical side. An introductory lecture is needed to understand Italian cooking. Its peculiarity is highlighted by a knowledge of history, geography and other social customs; knowing these allows the students to better appreciate this rich aspect of Italian life.

      The course will include actual cooking and learning how to prepare Italian meals: antipasti, first courses, second courses with vegetable side dishes, desserts - and of course, how to make a good pizza. After learning how to prepare each meal, the class will enjoy eating the meal together.

      This course has an additional fee for materials.

    • Fall
      Anthropology Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Anthropology Italian 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This course analyzes various aspects of Italian culture through lectures, readings, discussions, and observation research projects. Students will develop an understanding of contemporary Italy, encompassing its recent history, regional differences, social institutions, and contemporary issues. Students will also reflect on their cultural upbringings and beliefs, and to share their Italian culture experiences in class. Students are encouraged to break down commonly held stereotypes and experience the realities of contemporary Italian life.

    • Fall
      Architecture Art 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Architecture Art 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      The course intends to provide all students with an introduction to contemporary architecture, with special interest in the contemporary city. It will focus on the major trends, events, key figures and works in architectural and urban history. Major architectural and urban trends and perspectives will be discussed on an international scale, from the late 19th century to the present.

      Lectures and class discussions will provide the framework of the course. Walking tours and visits to selected parts of the city will be scheduled. Selected readings will be assigned in advance, in view of the lectures and visits. Two in-class tests will be scheduled on the topics of the architectural lectures and of the visits, to make the discussion fruitful. Additional assignments may be announced at the discretion of the professor.

    • Fall
      Management 300-level 3 credits Taught in English
      Spring
      Management 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      In this course, students will learn the concepts and techniques of operations management across all activities of an organization. This course covers topics related to methods of analyses that support organizational decision-making. Students will evaluate and apply the appropriate analytical technique for a variety of scenarios, perform quantitative analyses utilizing primary sources, and develop conclusions regarding effective management of operations in manufacturing and service environments.

      Prerequisite: introductory coursework in business management

    • Spring
      Art History 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

      This course provides a historical overview of the significant ideas, social and political events, artists, and art movements of the 20th Century, giving emphasis to avant-garde movements. Throughout the course, we will engage with various media from the last Century, such as painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, collage, film, design, performance art, and new media installations. In addition, the course will incorporate visits to local museums, art collections and temporary exhibitions.

    To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

    Field Studies

    Optional field studies are an excellent way to deepen your academic experience abroad. During your 1-credit field study course, you will participate in carefully planned excursions that allow you to explore the cultural, historical, and natural features of Italy. These overnight field experiences, combined with required academic components such as readings, research, and written assignments, will increase your understanding of the sites and locales visited.

    As an experiential learning method, optional field studies complement the larger academic program and provide you with opportunities to learn in new ways, to gain hands-on experience, and to connect your classroom learning to the world around you.

    Optional field studies have an additional fee, are subject to meeting minimum enrollment requirements to run, and may not be available every semester. Refer to the course list above for current field study offerings.

    Internships

    USAC in-person and virtual internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development. Whether onsite or virtually, you will work closely with a USAC Resident Director (RD), an internship coordinator, and a professional supervisor to gain valuable experience and skills that can be applied to your chosen career field. Internships are also a great way to immerse yourself in the culture of Italy, deepen your cross-cultural understanding, and help you develop intercultural communication and language skills in an internationally focused organization or other professional work setting.

    Among the many benefits of an internship experience, USAC in-person and virtual internships help you

    • Learn about a career that matches your academic and personal interests
    • Gain practical, hands-on experience
    • Master highly sought-after soft skills such as time management, teamwork, and problem solving
    • Build a network of professional contacts
    • Improve your resume
    • Cultivate intercultural communication skills that are essential in a globalized workforce
    • Develop an understanding of the workplace norms, expectations, and culture of Italy

    For eligibility requirements and application information, see the USAC internship page.

    For more information about placement options, see the Torino internship page.

    Host University Courses

    Attending a host university course is a great option for students looking to expand their academic experience abroad. By auditing a class at the University of Torino, USAC students can experience firsthand the academic style of Italy, immerse themselves in the academic community of Torino, and get to know local university students with similar academic interests. Most courses are taught in Italian, but English-language offerings may be available.

    While it may be possible to earn academic credit for host university courses, the University of Torino does not provide an official university transcript for courses completed by USAC students. Instead, they may provide a letter verifying participation in the course and the grade received. Be sure to work with your home university academic advisor to determine if host university courses will be accepted for credit. Please note that the University of Torino may follow a different academic calendar than USAC. This means that final exams may take place after the USAC program has ended. It may be possible to arrange early exams, but USAC cannot guarantee this. Additionally, there may be supplementary fees associated with host university courses that are not covered by USAC program fees.

    Quick Details

    2023-24 Application Cycle

    • Summer: Open
      • Session I or I&II deadline: April 1
      • Session II deadline: May 1
    • Fall/Yearlong: Open
      • Deadline: May 1
    • Spring: Open
      • Deadline: October 1

    Eligibility

    Preferred Minimum GPA: 2.5

    Program Type

    Specialty

    Credits

    US Credit

    Program Capacity

    65 students

    Instruction

    English | Italian

    Member

    AACUPI--Association of American Colleges and Universities in Italy

    Passport & Visa

    Passport & Visa Information