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Online Courses Courses – 2021 Spring

Contact the USAC Enrollment Department to request a detailed syllabus at syllabus@usac.edu.

The following classes have space for additional student enrollments.

Intensive Language Courses

Language courses are taught sequentially (back-to-back) and allow you to complete a full year of language in one semester. The first course in the series runs from mid-January to mid-March; the second course runs mid-March to mid-May. You may register for either one or both courses.

Spring
300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

The use of Spanish in a business environment involves using variables as language develops in specific contexts. Thus, the dynamics in this course will enrich vocabulary within specific semantic fields related to business methods and therefore will be essential to student's immersion in public spaces in commercial transactions.

Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

Global Perspectives on Health

Fall
300-level 3 credits Taught in English
Spring
300-level 3 credits Taught in English

This course offers an introduction to the major issues related to intercultural communication. The main course objectives are to provide students with an understanding of the intercultural communication process, to develop the skills necessary to analyze intercultural interaction episodes, and to reflect on one’s own communicating behaviour in intercultural settings. Emphasis will also be placed on the host culture.

Entreprenuership

Fall
300-level 3 credits Taught in English
Spring
300-level 3 credits Taught in English

This course offers an introduction to the major issues related to intercultural communication. The main course objectives are to provide students with an understanding of the intercultural communication process, to develop the skills necessary to analyze intercultural interaction episodes, and to reflect on one’s own communicating behaviour in intercultural settings. Emphasis will also be placed on the host culture.

Spring
General Business 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

This course introduces the theory and practice of the fast-growing field of social entrepreneurship.

The course will focus on guiding students through the process of creating a social enterprise. Students will be challenged to identify solutions to social issues and then develop a business idea that both delivers social impact as well as financial returns. Students will learn how to screen solutions, develop value propositions, analyze their beneficiaries expected experience, identify required activities and capabilities necessary for delivering the promised solution, evaluate stakeholder impacts, frame and scope their venture as well as develop financial success indicators.

The approach to developing, testing, planning and launching a new social business utilized in this course is based on the work of Professors Ian McMillan and James Thompson from the Wharton Social Entrepreneurship Program as well as the Social Business Model Canvas developed by the Asia-based innovation company, Tandemic.

Throughout the course, students will be challenged to look beyond traditional boundaries and critically assess alternative ways of doing business that develop innovative approaches to some of today’s major social problems.

Spring
300-level 3 credits Taught in Spanish

The use of Spanish in a business environment involves using variables as language develops in specific contexts. Thus, the dynamics in this course will enrich vocabulary within specific semantic fields related to business methods and therefore will be essential to student's immersion in public spaces in commercial transactions.

Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

Global Perspectives on Culture and Society

Spring
Gender, Race, and Identity Sociology Women's Studies / Gender Studies 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

The social and structural hierarchy in India controlled the lives of its people throughout history. The Indian caste system has not only integrated itself into the culture, but it has also been the cause of inequality that has oppressed classes of people for centuries. This course will cover topics such as the history of the caste system, religion, politics, gender, and class inequality.

Spring
Anthropology History Political Science 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

With new state-formation, democratization processes and economic transformation in Europe, a (re-) emergence of collective identities constructed along cultural, ethnic and religious lines across state boundaries can be observed. They have the inherent potential for profound processes of renewal as well as for violent conflicts. How do specific ethnic and religious groups, society and politics react? What are existing patterns for managing diversity and what new policy models and programs for management of cultural and social pluralism emerge? What happens to minorities involved in these change processes? In this class students will debate diversity and conflict in civil society to get a better understanding for peaceful and democratic decision-making.

The students will become familiar with basic concepts, techniques and approaches of involved disciplines (cultural anthropology, ethnographic research, migration studies and conflict research) to understand cultural processes and phenomena. Culture and identity in general terms will be defined: Surface and deeper levels of culture, stereotyping and prejudice, racism, and diversity. Students obtain practice in theoretical readings and debates as well as in data evaluation in relation to the study of cultural and social changes, transnationalism and social cohesion and conflict in a modern multicultural society.

For a better understanding we analyse the history of postcolonial Germany and Europe and its cultural and religious landscape, have a close look at migration history and trends in a globalized world. We will then compare political and policy approaches to cultural and religious diversity and conflict in Germany to those in other European countries and focus on different aspects covering migrant labor, political asylum, migration and illegality, migrant settlement structures, formation of cultural and religious communities, daily conflicts and crime.

Fall
300-level 3 credits Taught in English
Spring
300-level 3 credits Taught in English

This course offers an introduction to the major issues related to intercultural communication. The main course objectives are to provide students with an understanding of the intercultural communication process, to develop the skills necessary to analyze intercultural interaction episodes, and to reflect on one’s own communicating behaviour in intercultural settings. Emphasis will also be placed on the host culture.

Quick Details

2021-22 Application Cycle

Summer: Open

Eligibility

Minimum age: 16 years old

Minimum GPA: 2.0 (3.2 for high school students)

Program Type

Specialty Online

Credits

3-18 US credits