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Lüneburg Courses – 2022 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of language courses plus electives in German and European studies. All students must complete a minimum of two language courses, although we strongly encourage students to complete an entire language track. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Click the course title to view course details, description, and availability.

German Language Tracks

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks as well as elective language and literature courses. The track courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in the track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it. Language course sections are kept to a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Track I: 14 credits

Prerequisite: None

  1. Elementary German I
  2. Elementary German II
  3. Intermediate German I
  4. Intermediate German II

Track II: 12 credits

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college German

  1. Intermediate German I
  2. Intermediate German II
  3. German Composition I
  4. German Composition II

Track III: 9 credits

Prerequisite: 4 semesters of college German

  1. German Composition I
  2. German Composition II
  3. Advanced German I

Track IV: 9 credits

Prerequisite: 6 semesters of college German

  1. Advanced German I
  2. Advanced German II

      Language Courses

      • Fall
        German 100-level 4 credits Taught in German
        Spring
        German 100-level 4 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of German. This class introduces German grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students will learn greetings and useful expressions as well as basic skills in reading, writing, listening, above all, speaking. At the end of the class students will be able to engage in simple conversations with native speakers and navigate German speaking towns and cities.

      • Fall
        German 100-level 4 credits Taught in German
        Spring
        German 100-level 4 credits Taught in German

        This class introduces German grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students will learn greetings and useful expressions as well as basic skills in reading, writing, listening, above all, speaking. At the end of the class students will be able to engage in simple conversations with native speakers and navigate German speaking towns and cities.

        Prerequisite: one semester of college-level German

      • Fall
        German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German Cancelled
        Spring
        German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of German, focusing on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through active preparation for/and participation in classroom activities. Grammar and vocabulary are taught in the context of modern German culture in an immersive environment.

        Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level German

      • Fall
        German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German Cancelled
        Spring
        German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of German, focusing on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through active preparation for/and participation in classroom activities. Grammar and vocabulary are taught in the context of modern German culture in an immersive environment.

        Prerequisite: three semesters of college-level German

      • Fall
        German 300-level 3 credits Taught in German
        Spring
        German 300-level 3 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of German language students. Students will analyse written text, summarize readings, and practice using new vocabulary in written expressions.

        Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level German

      • Fall
        German 300-level 3 credits Taught in German
        Spring
        German 300-level 3 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of German language students. Students will analyse written text, summarize readings, and practice using new vocabulary in written expressions.

        Prerequisite: five semesters of college-level German

      • Fall
        German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German
        Spring
        German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced German language students. Students will analyse written text, summarize readings, and practice using new vocabulary in written and oral expressions.

        Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level German

      • Fall
        German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German
        Spring
        German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German

        This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced German language students. Students will analyse written text, summarize readings, and practice using new vocabulary in written and oral expressions.

        Prerequisite: seven semesters of college-level German

              Fall Semester

              Language and Literature Electives

              • Fall
                German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German
                Spring
                German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course is designed for students with an advanced knowledge of German who want to augment their ability to comprehend spoken language and to express themselves more fluently. Possible gaps or poorly assimilated concepts from earlier language learning will be addressed, especially the particularly difficult grammatical elements such as syntactic structures, prepositions, and the subjunctive.

                Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level German

              German and European Studies

              • Fall
                Anthropology History Political Science 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

                With new state-formation, democratization processes and economic transformation in Western Europe, a (re-) emergence of collective identities constructed along cultural, ethnic and religious lines across state boundaries can be observed. They have the inherent potential for profound processes of renewal as well as for violent conflicts. How do specific ethnic and religious groups, society and politics react? What are existing patterns for managing diversity and what new policy models and programs for management of cultural and social pluralism emerge? What happens to minorities involved in these change processes? In this class students will debate diversity and conflict in civil society to get a better understanding for peaceful and democratic decision-making.

              • Fall
                Film German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course examines German Cinema in a chronological order, starting with the silent era in the '20s, which includes the beginnings of the sound era and its technical innovations, and concluding with cinema under the Nazis and post-WWII. Thereby, the focuses will be on specific West and East German film genres like "Heimatfilm" and "Red Western". Movie night sessions may be open to other students as well. Most of the movies analysed and screened will have English subtitles. The assigned literature is available in English.

                Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level German

              • Fall
                German 200-level 3 credits Taught in English

                Introduction to the culture and civilization of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, both in historical/political perspective and contemporary society. The student will study the characteristics and the customs of the Germans by observing daily life as well as through readings and class discussions.

              • Fall
                Geography Natural Resources 400-level 3 credits Taught in English
                Spring
                Geography Natural Resources 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

                An interdisciplinary investigation of how human activities impact the Earth’s environment on a global scale. Examination of population, resource use, climate change, and biodiversity from scientific/technical and social/economic/historical/political perspectives.

              • Fall
                Anthropology History 100-level 1 credit Taught in English
                Spring
                Anthropology History 100-level 1 credit Taught in English

                As a country formed by immigrants from all over Europe, the U.S. has long and deep cultural attachments and family links to Germany. Many students who opt to come to study in Germany do so because of some distant ancestral connection with this country. Germany’s diasporic relationship with the U.S. means that this project also offers insight into the specific socio-historic relationship binding Germany and the U.S. At the same time, immigrants from many other European countries left Europe in the late 19th century through German harbors. Germany, and especially the Northern parts (Hamburg, Bremerhaven), has particularly good resources, as it was many times the place from where people emigrated, leaving Europe and their homes behind forever.

                Students will become familiar with basic concepts, techniques and approaches of genealogical research. With the availability of extraordinary databases to aid family research, genealogy has entered into an exciting new era. This course will help students excavate the archaeology of their family history by orientating them through some of the rich repositories of records and censuses, to help locate them and their family in the 21st century.

              • Fall
                Economics Political Science 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

                The course provides a general introduction to the European Union. Students learn about political theories of integration and study how scholars explain the establishment of the EU and its impact on the nation states and their economies. After examining the history of European integration and the political and economic context in which it developed, we cover the main institutions and their role in day to day politics. In the final part of the class, we analyze core EU policies, such as security, trade, social and economic policies.

              Spring Semester

              Language and Literature Electives

              • Spring
                German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course is designed to develop student competency in German language as it relates to business and economics. Students will develop terminology and syntax in economics, business administration, and marketing. Students will also become proficient in German business writing, correspondence, and verbal and written translation of business-related materials.

                Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level German

              • Spring
                German 300-level 3 credits Taught in German

                Reading and discussion of selected novels, which demonstrate main topics and ideas in contemporary German literature, reappraising German history, the reunifications, and women's literature. Underlying ideas, the particular characteristics of the German people, and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves will be discussed.

                Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level German

              • Spring
                German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course is designed to improve the knowledge, listening, and expressive capabilities of intermediate language students. Students will not only learn necessary vocabulary to express themselves in daily situations, but they will also learn to navigate more complex situations through conversation and free discussion of contemporary topics, using visual material, listening comprehension exercises, and articles from German newspapers and magazines. The first part of the class will deal with different conversational themes, such as telephone conversation, s, travel agency, etc. Related vocabulary will be introduced. Students will practice new vocabulary with role- playing, class discussion, as well as discussions of real-life situations.

                Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level German

              • Spring
                German World Languages and Literatures 300-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course is designed to improve the knowledge, listening and expressive capabilities of intermediate/advanced language students. Students will not only learn necessary vocabulary to express oneself in daily situations, but also learn to express themselves in more difficult contexts through guided conversation and free discussion of contemporary topics using visual material, listening comprehension exercises, and articles from German newspapers and magazines. Related vocabulary will be introduced. Students will practice new vocabulary with role playing, class discussion, as well as real life situations.

                Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level German

              • Fall
                German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German
                Spring
                German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course is designed for students with an advanced knowledge of German who want to augment their ability to comprehend spoken language and to express themselves more fluently. Possible gaps or poorly assimilated concepts from earlier language learning will be addressed, especially the particularly difficult grammatical elements such as syntactic structures, prepositions, and the subjunctive.

                Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level German

              German and European Studies

              • Spring
                History Political Science 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

                In order to understand the most infamous two decades of German history, its processes and society, we look back in history and uncover key moments that likely built the foundation for a totalitarian system of hitherto unknown extremes. Some of these catalysts can be found in traditions and events that transpired within the past 60-100 years. After this introduction of cultural, economic and political factors, special attention will be paid to the impact that these factors had on the daily lives of Germans at the time. This includes antisemitism, gender relations, education, youth culture, resistance movements, and more. Finally, special attention will be paid to the post 1945 period, what with its foundation of two separate German states, and the way that these two dealt with their past. The seminar closes with a look at the presence of these topics in unified Germany, with a particular focus on the politics of memory and the memorial culture challenged by the recent surge of right-wing nationalism. The schedule may change due to current events.

              • Fall
                Geography Natural Resources 400-level 3 credits Taught in English
                Spring
                Geography Natural Resources 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

                An interdisciplinary investigation of how human activities impact the Earth’s environment on a global scale. Examination of population, resource use, climate change, and biodiversity from scientific/technical and social/economic/historical/political perspectives.

              • Spring
                Political Science 400-level 3 credits Taught in English

                This course will cover major developments in German politics throughout history, including the unification of small principalities and kingdoms, the division of two republics, and democratization. Students will develop the historical and theoretical foundation necessary to effectively analyze historical influences on governmental reform and policymaking.

              • Fall
                Anthropology History 100-level 1 credit Taught in English
                Spring
                Anthropology History 100-level 1 credit Taught in English

                As a country formed by immigrants from all over Europe, the U.S. has long and deep cultural attachments and family links to Germany. Many students who opt to come to study in Germany do so because of some distant ancestral connection with this country. Germany’s diasporic relationship with the U.S. means that this project also offers insight into the specific socio-historic relationship binding Germany and the U.S. At the same time, immigrants from many other European countries left Europe in the late 19th century through German harbors. Germany, and especially the Northern parts (Hamburg, Bremerhaven), has particularly good resources, as it was many times the place from where people emigrated, leaving Europe and their homes behind forever.

                Students will become familiar with basic concepts, techniques and approaches of genealogical research. With the availability of extraordinary databases to aid family research, genealogy has entered into an exciting new era. This course will help students excavate the archaeology of their family history by orientating them through some of the rich repositories of records and censuses, to help locate them and their family in the 21st century.

              • Spring
                Speech Communications 300-level 3 credits Taught in English

                An analysis of the impact of culture on communication. This course also offers students the opportunity to develop an awareness of cultural differences and the ability to deal with them. Interactions, gestures and communication styles often differ between cultures and can easily lead to misunderstandings. We will analyze our own cultures in order to better understand those around us. The course contents will cover theoretical background, application, and active learning elements.

              • Spring
                Anthropology German 300-level 3 credits Taught in German

                All cultures have developed their myths and legends, consisting of narratives of their history, religions, and heroes. Myths and legends hold symbolic meaning, and this is a major reason why they have survived. They are the authority in the study of existentialism and annotations of myths are necessary.

                In this course the emphasis is put on two major fields:

                •Different myths from Antiquity to Modern Age. A special attention will be given to Greek, Roman and North-European Mythology.

                •Special topics such as mythological places and creatures etc.

                The globalizing postmodern world evokes the need for understanding different, old cultures within its specific historical contexts. The human search for an explanation of the world through basic principles (God, universe, nature, and man) and their relation to each other is a legitimate academic approach.

                In this context, the course proposes to study how man has created a system of myths, legends and symbols throughout history in different cultures that produced a series of modern phenomena and cultural conventions connected to its specific localizations.

                Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level German

              • Spring
                German 400-level 3 credits Taught in German

                This course is designed to introduce students to methods and strategies of teaching German as a Foreign Language. We will cover language acquisition theories, linguistics, learning and teaching strategies, as well as lesson planning tools and monitoring learning outcomes. Students will observe USAC German classes and apply their skills in small student teaching units. The class is tailored to students who are considering starting a foreign language teaching career, as well as students who are already teachers’ training programs.

                Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level German

              To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

              Internships

              USAC in-person and virtual internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development. Whether onsite or virtually, you will work closely with a USAC Resident Director (RD), an internship coordinator, and a professional supervisor to gain valuable experience and skills that can be applied to your chosen career field. Internships are also a great way to immerse yourself in the culture of Germany, deepen your cross-cultural understanding, and help you develop intercultural communication and language skills in an internationally focused organization or other professional work setting.

              Among the many benefits of an internship experience, USAC in-person and virtual internships help you

              • Learn about a career that matches your academic and personal interests
              • Gain practical, hands-on experience
              • Master highly sought-after soft skills such as time management, teamwork, and problem solving
              • Build a network of professional contacts
              • Improve your resume
              • Cultivate intercultural communication skills that are essential in a globalized workforce
              • Develop an understanding of the workplace norms, expectations, and culture of Germany

              For eligibility requirements and application information, see the USAC internship page.

              For more information about placement options, see the Lüneburg internship page.

              Host University Courses

              Attending a host university course is a great option for students looking to expand their academic experience abroad. By auditing a class at Leuphana University Lüneburg , USAC students can experience firsthand the academic style of Germany, immerse themselves in the academic community of Lüneburg , and get to know local university students with similar academic interests. Most courses are taught in German, but English-language offerings may be available.

              While it may be possible to earn academic credit for host university courses, Leuphana University Lüneburg does not provide an official university transcript for courses completed by USAC students. Instead, they may provide a letter verifying participation in the course and the grade received. Be sure to work with your home university academic advisor to determine if host university courses will be accepted for credit. Please note that Leuphana University Lüneburg typically follows a different academic calendar than USAC. This means that final exams are likely to take place after the USAC program has ended. It may be possible to arrange early exams, but USAC cannot guarantee this. Additionally, there may be supplementary fees associated with host university courses that are not covered by USAC program fees.

              Additional Offerings

              Courses

              • Fall
                Political Science 400-level 3 credits Taught in English Cancelled

                IThis course is divided into four parts: history, theory, structures, and issues in International Affairs. It starts with a historical and theoretical background to International Affairs and provides an overview of international structures and organisational developments before turning to specific issues and case studies. It covers International Affairs since 1945, with a focus on current events. We will examine how different actors – states, international organizations, and NGOs – engage in international politics to tackle a variety of global challenges.

              • Fall
                German 200-level 3 credits Taught in German Cancelled

                This course offers an introduction to German literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with a study of works from different literary movements that demonstrate underlying ideas of this period. The selected books are simplified versions of the classics with brief explanations of the more difficult words and expressions, comprehension exercises and background information to expand and consolidate the students’ knowledge of the German language and culture.

                Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level German

              Quick Details

              2021-22 App. Cycle

              Spring: Open

              2022-23 App. Cycle

              Summer Sessions: Opens 9/1
              Fall/Yearlong: Opens 9/1
              Spring: Opens 9/1

              Eligibility

              Preferred GPA: 2.5

              Program Type

              Specialty

              Credits

              US Credit

              Program Capacity

              60 students

              Instruction

              English | German

              Passport & Visa

              Passport & Visa Information