Lüneburg, Germany
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Lüneburg, Germany | 2018 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of a language track plus electives in literature and language, and German and European studies. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

German Language Tracks

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks in which courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in a track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it to be prepared for success at the next level. Language courses are small and typically have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks as well as elective language and literature courses. The track courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in the track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it. Language course sections are kept to a maximum enrollment of 15 students each. All students are required to select a language track plus elective courses for a total of 12-18 courses.

Track I (14 credits total)—Prerequisite: none

Track II (12 credits total)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college German

Track III (9 credits total)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college German

Track IV (9 credits total)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college German

Fall Semester

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in German

German and European Studies

Spring Semester

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in German

German and European Studies

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development and are counted as part of your credit load. Students are placed in a German-speaking environment, with high exposure to culture and language, and must be able to communicate at an advanced language level. Limited placements in an English-based environment may also be available. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses.

USAC will support students who want to apply for any major field of work/study. Past placements have included: an analytic company that specializes in market data analysis for the automotive industry, non-profit organizations, and Leuphana Lüneburg University. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor on site.

Eligibility: enrollment in the Lüneburg program, a minimum GPA of 3.0, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

Host University Courses

Advanced German students may attend one course offered by Leuphana University Lüneburg in the fields of German Literature, Sustainability Sciences, Philosophy, History, Economics, Sociology, Environmental Sciences, or Politics. Leuphana follows a different calendar, with final exams in February (fall semester) or June (spring semester). It may be possible to organize early exams (December and May) on an individual basis, but USAC cannot guarantee this. There will be a $100 deposit for each course, which will be refunded upon completion of the course. Courses taken at Leuphana are taken in addition to your USAC classes and do not replace the minimum number of required USAC credits. Leuphana courses are reported on letter or certificate of completion with the grade earned. Work with your home academic advisor to determine whether such courses will be accepted for credit

Course Descriptions

Advanced German I

Fall (German; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced language students. Readings of narratives, poetry, essays and journalism are analyzed for style, the meaning of vocabulary in precise context, and serve as the basis for subsequent discussion. Each week complex grammatical topics are introduced and practiced through written and oral exercises. Basic or general notions of style are presented, and students work to strengthen their own personal style through frequent written assignments. Prerequisite: six semesters of college German.

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Advanced German II

Fall (German; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced language students. Readings of narratives, poetry, essays and journalism are analyzed for style, the meaning of vocabulary in precise context, and serve as the basis for subsequent discussion. Each week complex grammatical topics are introduced and practiced through written and oral exercises. Basic or general notions of style are presented, and students work to strengthen their own personal style through frequent written assignments. Prerequisite: seven semesters of college German.

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Business German

Spring (German; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course has been created for students who wish to develop competence in an area of German which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. The objective of this course is to familiarize the student with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order that they be able to communicate correctly in this context. Business writing, correspondence, oral and written translation of business related material is also practiced.

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Contemporary German Literature

Spring (German; 300-level; 3 credits)

Reading and discussion of selected novels, which demonstrate main topics and ideas in contemporary German literature, reappraising German history, the reunifications, and women's literature. Underlying ideas, the particular characteristics of the German people, and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves will be discussed. Prerequisite: six semesters of college German. Taught in German. (Spring semester)

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Elementary German I

Fall (German; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (German; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills.

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Elementary German II

Fall (German; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (German; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills. Prerequisite: one semester of college German.

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Ethnic Conflict and Diversity in Europe

Fall (Anthropology, History, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)

With new state-formation, democratization processes and economic transformation in Western Europe, a (re-) emergence of collective identities constructed along cultural, ethnic and religious lines across state boundaries can be observed. They have the inherent potential for profound processes of renewal as well as for violent conflicts. How do specific ethnic and religious groups, society and politics react? What are existing patterns for managing diversity and what new policy models and programs for management of cultural and social pluralism emerge? What happens to minorities involved in these change processes? In this class students will debate diversity and conflict in civil society to get a better understanding for peaceful and democratic decision-making.

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German Composition I

Fall (German; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 300-level; 3 credits)

Students are required to write compositions regularly. Part of the class is used to correct the compositions or exercises which the student does outside of class. New grammatical topics are introduced with exercises reinforcing the use of those elements. Part of the class is utilized for selected readings, discussion, vocabulary building and more. Prerequisite: four semesters of college German.

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German Composition II

Fall (German; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 300-level; 3 credits)

Students are required to write compositions regularly. Part of the class is used to correct the compositions or exercises which the student does outside of class. New grammatical topics are introduced with exercises reinforcing the use of those elements. Part of the class is utilized for selected readings, discussion, vocabulary building and more. Prerequisite: five semesters of college German.

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German Conversation I

Fall (German; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to improve the knowledge, listening and expressive capabilities of intermediate language students. Students will not only learn necessary vocabulary to express oneself in daily situations but also in more complex situations through conversation and free discussion of contemporary topics, using visual material, listening comprehension exercises and articles from German newspapers and magazines. The first part of the class will deal with different conversational themes such as telephone conversation, train station, travel agency, etc. Related vocabulary will be introduced. Students will practice new vocabulary with role playing, class discussion as well as real life situations.

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German Conversation II

Fall (German; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objective of the course is to facilitate the acquisition of language necessary to express oneself in daily situations as well as in more difficult contexts. The first part of the class will deal with different conversational themes such as telephone conversation, train station, travel agency, etc. Related vocabulary will be introduced. Students will practice new vocabulary with role playing and discussion. The second part of the class concentrates on discussion and oral presentations.

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German-Speaking Europe and its Culture

Fall (German; 200-level; 3 credits)

Introduction to the culture and civilization of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, both in historical/political perspective and contemporary society. The student will study the characteristics and the customs of the Germans by observing daily life as well as through readings and class discussions. Taught in English. (Fall semester)

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Germany 1933-1945: Culture, Society and Politics in a Dictatorship

Fall (History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

To better understand the most infamous two decades of German history, its processes and society we look back in history and uncover historical reasons that might have helped to provide ground for a totalitarian system of hitherto unknown extremes. Some of these catalysts can be found in traditions and events of the previous 60 or 100 years. After this introduction of cultural, economic and political factors special attention is paid to the impact these factors have on daily lives of the Germans of that time. The Historikerstreit and other questions such as resistance movements, reaction of various ethnic groups are objects of examination as well. Finally special attention will be paid to the post 1945 period with the foundation of two separate German states and the way the young Germanies dealt with their past. The seminar closes with a look at the presence of these topics in unified Germany. The schedule may change due to current events.

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Global Environment

Spring (400-level; 3 credits)

An interdisciplinary investigation of how human activities impact the Earth’s environment on a global scale. Examination of population, resource use, climate change, and biodiversity from scientific/technical and social/economic/historical/political perspectives.

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Government and Politics in Germany and Europe

Spring (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

With Europe largely in ruins after World War II, victors and the vanquished faced a daunting task of rebuilding virtually every aspect of their countries. Germany emerged from the war as a country divided politically as well as geographically. West Germany, benefiting from the wealth and strength of the post-war United States, developed a capitalist democracy aligned with Britain and France and other European democracies. East Germany became one of several Warsaw Pact Soviet satellite countries with a communist-style government and economy. When the Soviet Union collapsed in the 1980s, the end of East German communism quickly followed and Germany was reunited for the first time in almost fifty years. Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the dynamics in Germany and Europe and how this area of the world may play a major part in the century to come. (Spring semester)

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In Search of German Roots: Tracing your Family Genealogy

Fall (Anthropology, History; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Anthropology, History; 100-level; 1 credit)

As a country formed by immigrants from all over Europe, the U.S. has longstanding and deep cultural attachments and family links to Germany. Many students who opt to come to study in Germany do so because of some distant ancestral connection to this country. Germany’s

diasporic relationship to the U.S. means that this seminar also offers insight into the specific socio-historical relationship binding Germany and the U.S . At the same time, immigrants from many other European countries left Europe in the late 19th century through German harbors.

With the availability of extraordinary databases to aid in family research, genealogy has entered into an exciting new era. Germany, and especially the northern part of it (Hamburg, Bremerhaven, etc.) has particularly good resources, as it was frequently the place from which people emigrated, leaving Europe and their homes behind forever.

This seminar will help you find the roots of your family tree by guiding you through some of the rich repositories of records and censuses to help locate you and your family in the 21st century.

You will understand the broad history of migration from Europe to Northern America with the help of an excursion to an emigration museum, and you will receive expert hints from trained on-site archivists and genealogists to help you navigate your way through the extensive collection of archival data and online records.

By the end of this project, you will have a general overview of the genealogist’s tool kit, which should inspire a lifelong interest in your family history.

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Intercultural Communication

Spring (Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)

Interactions, gestures, and communication styles often differ between cultures and can easily lead to misunderstandings. This course offers students the opportunity to increase cultural self-awareness and to develop an awareness of cultural differences and the ability to deal with them. The course will consist of a theoretical background, its application, and active learning elements to augment the understanding of cultural contexts, allowing the student to improve his/her communication skills and to formulate appropriate practices. Taught in English. (Spring semester)

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Intermediate German I

Fall (German; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 200-level; 3 credits)

These courses emphasize learning the structure of the German language. Classes are divided into three components: structure, conversation and reading/writing, each of which is related by common topics. The courses include a rapid review of basic elements. Students will also begin to write short compositions regularly. Prerequisite: two semesters of college German.

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Intermediate German II

Fall (German; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 200-level; 3 credits)

These courses emphasize learning the structure of the German language. Classes are divided into three components: structure, conversation and reading/writing, each of which is related by common topics. The courses include a rapid review of basic elements. Students will also begin to write short compositions regularly. Prerequisite: three semesters of college German.

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Introduction to German Literature

Fall (German; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course offers an introduction to German Literature of the 19th and 20th century with a study of works from different literary movements that demonstrate underlying ideas of this period. The selected books are simplified versions of the classics with brief explanations of the more difficult words and expressions, comprehension exercises and background information to expand and consolidate the students’ knowledge of the German language and culture. Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college German. Taught in German.

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Myths and Legends

Spring (300-level; 3 credits)

All cultures have developed their own myths and legends, consisting of narratives of their history, religions, and heroes. Myths, legends, and allegories contain great symbolic meaning, and this is a major reason why they have survived the ages and remain, to this day, a primary source in the study of our existence. This course examines how mankind has created these systems, interpretions of them and their importance. We will first study a variety of myths from antiquity to the present, with special attention given to Greek, Roman, and North-European Mythology. Secondly we will examine specific topics such as mythological places and creatures. Taught in German. Prerequisite of 4 semester of college German. (Spring semester)

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Seminar in German Language

Fall (German; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (German; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to expand and perfect the expressive capabilities, particularly oral, of advanced language students. Possible gaps or poorly assimilated concepts from earlier language learning will be treated, especially the particularly difficult grammatical elements such as syntactic structures, prepositions, and the subjunctive. As to vocabulary, we go beyond the meaning of the word to deal with idioms, set phrases and so on. The material utilized is practical and varied. In addition to grammatical exercises, we use literary and non-literary texts, tapes and exercises in composition and conversation. Prerequisite: six semesters of college German. Taught in German.

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Teaching German as a Foreign Language

Spring (German; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to methods and strategies of teaching German as a Foreign Language. We will cover language acquisition theories, linguistics, learning and teaching strategies as well as lesson planning tools and monitoring learning outcomes. Students will observe USAC German classes and apply their skills in small student teaching units. The class addresses students who consider starting a foreign language teaching career as well students who are already in a teacher training program. The class will also be open to a limited number of native speakers of German in order to enhance further contact between USAC and Leuphana students.

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The European Union: Processes, Dynamics, and Structures

Fall (Economics, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

The course provides a general introduction to the European Union. After examining the history of European integration and the political and economic context in which it developed, we cover the main institutions Commission, Council, and Parliament and their role in day to day politics. We then discuss political theories of integration and study how scholars explain the establishment of the EU and its impact on the nation states and their economies. In the final part of the class we analyze core EU policies, such as environmental and economic policies.

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