Pau, France
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Pau, France | 2018 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 credits of intensive language courses taken at the Université de Pau's Institute of French Studies with other international students, plus 3 to 6 credits of elective courses in French culture, business or European Studies designed specifically for USAC students. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

French Language Studies

All students are required to take a minimum of 12 language credits including a French Conversation course. Language course sections are kept to a maximum enrollment of 20 students each.

Conversation Courses (1, 2, or 3 credits each)

Language and Literature Courses

Fall Semester

French and European Studies

Courses are taught in English unless noted in French; courses taught in French are appropriate for third-year students or above unless otherwise indicated. You are required to enroll in at least one 3-credit USAC French and European Studies course or one University of Pau course in addition to your language courses.

Spring Semester

French and European Studies

 

Host University Courses

The University of Pau offers USAC students the option to audit courses in French Literature, English/American Literature, Art History, History, Geography, Economics, Law, and Sciences. These are a great way to become immersed in the local university and make friends outside of your USAC courses.

Basque language courses are available at the University both semesters at Beginning and Intermediate levels.

Internships

Spring only | Internship students are expected to remain in Pau until May 5.

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development and are counted as part of your credit load. Students are placed in a French-speaking environment, with high exposure to culture and language and must be able to communicate at an advanced language level in both oral and written French. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses. Pau internship opportunities fall into broad categories and USAC will do its best to identify placements that meet student interests. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor on site.

Eligibility: at least six semesters of college French, enrollment in the Pau program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship. Students should notify the USAC Central Office about their wish to do an internship at least 45 days prior to arrival in Pau.

French as Foreign Language Exams

As an official "examiner" center, the University of Pau offers French proficiency exams at all levels: beginner, intermediate and advanced exams. All students take the DUEF exam at the end of their program. The fee for the exam is included in the program fee.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professor is also teaching as a Visiting Professor.

Fall Semester:

Prof. Irina Kappler-Crookston, University of Idaho

Courses offered:

Prof. Kappler-Crookston, former chair, Spanish Instructor, and academic study abroad advisor for the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures has taught language, literature, and culture courses at the University of Idaho for nearly 30 years. She studied, lived, and worked in Italy, France, Spain, Mexico, and Ecuador before and after arriving at the University of Idaho where she received many service and teaching awards including the Idaho Foreign Language Teacher of the Year Award and the University of Idaho Advisor of the Year Award. She has taught multiple times for USAC in San Sebastián, Bilbao, Torino, Pau and Madrid.

Spring Semester:

Dr. Russell Meeuf, University of Idaho

Courses offered:

Russell Meeuf teaches film and media studies in the School of Journalism and Mass Media at the University of Idaho. His research examines the transnational dynamics of cinema with an emphasis on stars and celebrities, and he teaches a variety of courses on film, television, journalism and other media-related topics.

Dr. Ryanne Pilgeram, University of Idaho

Courses offered:

Ryanne Pilgeram is an associate professor in the department of Sociology & Anthropology whose research focuses gender, race, and class in sustainable agriculture. She is 2014 the recipient of the Hoffman Award for Teaching Excellence and the University of Idaho Women's Center's 2016 Virginia Wolf Distinguished Service Award.

Course Descriptions

Business French

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to enable students to develop competence in an area which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. You will become familiar with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order to enable you to communicate correctly in the target language. Business writing, correspondence, oral and written translation of business related material is also practiced. In France, this course helps the student to prepare themselves for the Certificat Pratique du Français Economique et Commercial of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Paris and in Germany for the Zertifikat Deutsch für den Beruf. Prerequisite: six semesters of college French. Taught in French.

Back to Top

European Cinema

Fall (Art, Film; 300-level; 3 credits)

In this class, students will watch contemporary movies in the original from France, Germany, Italy, England, Poland, Bulgaria and Spain language with English subtitles that addresses issues such as traditions, religion, family, gender roles, politics, and national identity. The objective of the course is to help students analyze and examine the socio-cultural, political, and historical themes in post-war European movies to better understand the various cultures that make up the European Union. Through the figure of women protagonists in these films, this cultural analysis will specifically focus upon the role of women in diverse European societies and historical settings.

Back to Top

First Year French I

Fall (French; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (French; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of French grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary and useful expressions are studied. The goals of these courses are to build reading, writing, listening and above all speaking skills and to enable the students to handle basic communicative tasks and social situations.

Back to Top

First Year French II

Fall (French; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (French; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of French grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary and useful expressions are studied. The goals of these courses are to build reading, writing, listening and above all speaking skills and to enable the students to handle basic communicative tasks and social situations. Prerequisite: one semester of college French.

Back to Top

Fourth Year French I

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced language students. Readings of narrative, drama, poetry, essays and journalism are analyzed for style, for the meaning of vocabulary in precise context and serve as a basis for subsequent discussion. Close study of the register of the French language and transposition exercises. Students work to strengthen their own personal style through frequent written assignments. Prerequisite: six semesters of college French.

Back to Top

Fourth Year French II

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced language students. Readings of narrative, drama, poetry, essays and journalism are analyzed for style, for the meaning of vocabulary in precise context and serve as a basis for subsequent discussion. Close study of the register of the French language and transposition exercises. Students work to strengthen their own personal style through frequent written assignments. Prerequisite: seven semesters of college French.

Back to Top

French Conversation

Fall (300-level; 1 - 3 credits)
Spring (300-level; 1 - 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to facilitate the acquisition of language necessary to express oneself in daily situations as well as in more difficult contexts. Different conversational themes and related vocabulary are introduced for discussion.

Back to Top

French Stylistics

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

This class is set up as a continuation of the fourth year language courses. The material for this class will be taken from assigned reading materials and from student writing assignments. The general objectives are to: improve students' understanding of the written word; improve students' expression through writing; and to characterize different types of literary, journalistic and technical texts. The specific objectives are to develop and practice typical French expressions; the most important vocabulary and linguistic structures for this level; idioms; synonyms and antonyms; the relationship and derivation of nouns, adjectives and verbs; verbal periphrasis; and, the most common proverbs and sayings. Prerequisite: six semester of college French.

Back to Top

Gender and Society

Spring (300-level; 3 credits)

Focusing on issues of gender in contemporary society, with some reference to historical trends, this course examines gender with an emphasis on the ways it intersects with race, class, identity, sexuality, and ethnicity. The central aim is to foster critical thinking about gender and the ways in which the interlocking systems of colonialism, racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, ageism, and heterosexism shape us all. Drawing on readings from French scholars and examples from French and Francophone societies, we will also examine how people have resisted inequalities, worked to create new systems of change, and engaged in national and international transformational politics.

Back to Top

Government and Politics in France

Fall (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course aims at showing the specificities of French politics. It will present balance of power and go into detail about each power. It will also go into detail about elections and political parties so the students can understand the roots of today’s political debate. A review of some majors policies by the presidents of the 5th Republic will be also done in order to explain some evolution in the French society and illustrate the major difference between the everlasting gap between “gauche” and “droite”. Few minutes will be spent in the beginning of ach class to answer students’ questions.

Back to Top

Intercultural Communication

Fall (Speech Communications; 400-level; 3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to build and maintain positive communication and relationships across cultures. Students will explore the definition, nature, and manifestation of culture while examining their own values, traditions, and beliefs. Through active in-class and out-of-class activities, students will learn about the similarities and differences in communication behaviors and explore language usage, nonverbal style, and perceptions in order to see how they influence face-to-face communication between individuals of different cultures in the United States, Europe, and the rest of the world. Course benefits: knowledge about diverse communication and observation practices will enhance your ability to study, work, and live in any culture of the world.

Back to Top

Language and Cinema

Spring (Art; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course covers French cinema from the 1930s to the present, with one film viewing and discussion each week. Prerequisite: six semesters of college French.. Taught in French. (Spring semester)

Back to Top

Perspectives on Contemporary France

Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Students living and learning abroad are in an ideal position to reflect not only on the "realities" of the place where they are, but also on the cultural values, assumptions, and ways of thinking that have established those realities, and that inform the way the society views and discusses them. Using the book Sixty Million Frenchmen Can't Be Wrong as a model for the approach in this course, we will examine a series of French institutions and current social issues (structures of the 5th Republic, parties and electoral politics; social welfare system; debate over the EU and globalization; regionalism; immigration; gender and family; education and youth unemployment; etc.). We will use film, music, print and audiovisual media, and to the extent possible, interviews with French students of English as objects of study.

Back to Top

Second Year French I

Fall (French; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 200-level; 3 credits)

These courses involve a review and deeper study of the structure of the French language and the French culture. Practice of oral and written communication: speeches, discussions, interviews, role-playing, writing messages, statements, letters and stories. Practice of listening and reading comprehension through authentic materials such as news, films and literary texts. Prerequisite: two semesters of college French.

Back to Top

Second Year French II

Fall (French; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 200-level; 3 credits)

These courses involve a review and deeper study of the structure of the French language and the French culture. Practice of oral and written communication: speeches, discussions, interviews, role-playing, writing messages, statements, letters and stories. Practice of listening and reading comprehension through authentic materials such as news, films and literary texts. Prerequisite: three semesters of college French.

Back to Top

Seminar in French Language

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course is specifically designed for students with an advanced knowledge who want to augment their ability to comprehend spoken French and to express themselves more fluently in French. Prerequisite: six semesters of college French. Taught in French.

Back to Top

Survey of Art I: European/Western Art

Fall (Art; 200-level; 3 credits)

Art history of western Europe through the 17th century, with particular emphasis on country specific art. For example, students in France will study influential French artists along with important European artists of that period. The art and vision of the world of each period are studied through architecture, sculpture and painting, including: Romanesque art (the great cathedrals) and the Renaissance (da Vinci, Michelangelo, El Greco). The objectives of the course are to develop a more complete knowledge of European and local culture through art and to learn to identify, analyze and appreciate works of art. Prerequisite: four semesters of college French. Taught in French. (Fall semester)

Back to Top

Survey of French Literature I

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Navarre, Béarn, and southwest France have a rich history of political, social, and religious evolution, much of which can be traced through the study of literary works set in, or otherwise associated with, this region. Reading these works while living and studying in the area can both bring the texts to life for students and deepen their understanding and appreciation of their surroundings. Literary readings would include chansons de geste, Marguerite de Navarre, writers from the court of Henri IV, and even Dumas; the course would also integrate historiographical material (The Return of Martin Guerre) and life-writing (Marguerite de Valois).

Back to Top

Survey of French Literature II

Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

A survey of important literary movements in France during the 19th and 20th centuries, with one or two representative works from each. While it is necessarily reductive to fly so quickly over 200 years’ worth of literature and to shoehorn “representative” works into their supposed literary movements, the objective of this course is to give students a general understanding of the evolution of modern French literature and to introduce them to authors and works they may want to explore further on their own. As we consider successive movements--Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism, Decadence, Dada, Surrealism, Existentialism, Theatre of the Absurd/Avant-garde theatre, Négritude, and post-colonial Francophone literature--we will pay attention to significant features of form and style, while also considering historical and social context (the experience of multiple wars, the alienation of the human being in an increasingly mechanized technological world, the clashing perspectives of colonized and colonizer under the French colonial system, . . . ).

Back to Top

Third Year French I

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Classes revolve around compositions that the student writes frequently on a variety of topics. Part of the class is used to correct the composition or exercises, which the student does outside of class and on teaching the necessary expressions and structures for essay writing. The goal of these courses is to enable the students to express themselves effectively in formal and informal writing on practical, social and professional topics and to achieve a personal style in written French. Prerequisite: four semesters of college French.

Back to Top

Third Year French II

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Classes revolve around compositions that the student writes frequently on a variety of topics. Part of the class is used to correct the composition or exercises, which the student does outside of class and on teaching the necessary expressions and structures for essay writing. The goal of these courses is to enable the students to express themselves effectively in formal and informal writing on practical, social and professional topics and to achieve a personal style in written French. Prerequisite: five semesters of college French.

Back to Top

Travel Journalism

Spring (English, Journalism; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course introduces students to the key practices of travel journalism with a particular focus on questions of cross-cultural representation: how are issues of power, privilege and perspective reflected in typical travel narratives and in students’ own work? Students will use their own travel experiences to create text-based, video, and photographic stories. The course will also discuss strategies for using social media to augment and distribute their work.

Back to Top

Twentieth-Century and Contemporary French Literature

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Reflection on literary genres and their evolution in the 20th century. Study of philosophical dilemmas presented in 20th century French Literature. Readings from the works of Le Clézio, Mauriac, Céline, Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Duras and others. Prerequisite: six semesters of college French. Taught in French.

Back to Top