Lyon, France
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Lyon Courses - 2019 Summer Session II

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You will enroll in three to five credits in Session I and three to six credits in Session II. One additional credit may be earned in Session I if you enroll in the optional Paris Tour and Field Study.

At least one 3-credit course is required. Course availability is contingent upon student interest and enrollment and is subject to change. Scroll down for complete course descriptions and prerequisites.

French Language and Literature Studies

Summer language courses are intensive, with four credits of French taught in each session. Students will meet this requirement through a 3-credit language course plus the 1-credit French Conversation course. Language courses have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Session I and Session II

French and European Studies

Courses are taught in English unless noted; courses taught in French are appropriate for third-year students or above unless otherwise indicated.

Session I

Session II

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

Field studies

Deepen your academic experience by turning the optional Paris Tour into a 1-credit field study by completing additional academic requirements (readings, research, written assignments, reports, etc). Students who choose the field study option will keep a journal and prepare a research paper on a topic interest specific to Paris.

Course Descriptions

1940-1945 Shock! War, Occupation, and Resistance in France and Lyon

Summer Session II (History, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)

The course examines the history of France from the declaration of war to the Nazi invasion and occupation and, finally, to the liberation of the country. Students will read and learn about the wartime experience of French people, as well as about the political ideologies and cultural attitudes regarding war, the occupation, and the resistance. Emphasis will be put on the legitimacy quandary faced by the “Resistance” against the Vichy régime and Nazi occupation following the armistice with Germany. Indeed, the terms of the 1940 Armistice made the occupation of France’s Northern Zone impeccably legal, and the demise of the Third Republic and its replacement by the pro-German Vichy government was approved by a large majority vote in the National Assembly (the Parliament) on July 10, 1940.

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Art, City and Society in Lyon, from the Middle-Ages to Nowadays

Summer Session I (Architecture, Art, French, History; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course offers to explore artistic, architectural, and urban shapes of the city of Lyon as well as its representations through the historic point of view (from the Middle Ages until the Modern and Contemporary periods). The student will be analyzing public spaces through the ages and will then classify daily life scenes and social and cultural practices happening. Tours, field trips, field surveys, and visits to museums and galleries are a substantial part of the course.

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Basic French Conversation for Daily Communication

Summer Session I (100-level; 1 credit)

This is a course for students who have not taken any French language courses before. Its purpose is to provide the students with basic lexical, grammatical and functional resources to manage in daily situations while studying in France.

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Drawing and Painting in Lyon

Summer Session II (Art; 100-level; 1 credit)

In this studio course, we shall investigate a variety of approaches, techniques and processes in the art of drawing. In addition, we shall take advantage of Lyon’s world famous museums and monuments to learn about the city as it is reflected in its architecture, landscape, paintings and sculpture, and its people. The objective of this course will be to introduce students to the fundamentals of drawing while using the city of Lyon as a backdrop. The human figure, landscape, architecture, still life, plant life, and abstract art are some of the themes that will be explored.

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Fourth Year French I

Summer Session I (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

This advanced level course of French has been designed for students who have completed three years of French and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

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Fourth Year French II

Summer Session I (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Fourth Year French II has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of French and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

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Francophone Women Writers

Summer Session II (French, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 400-level; 3 credits)

The question of identity, and its multiple belonging and affiliations in its profound complexity, is the fundamental theme of our course while studying a variety of texts of francophone women writers. We will study the concept of identity seen through the eyes of a selected number of women writers in different linguistic, historical, social, and psychological perspectives. The students will be invited constantly to take account of sociohistorical context of their work: how the colonial history of the past impacts the postcolonial writing, and how it comes out in the text through a particular use of language by these women writers.

The students will be analyze and interpret the literary texts of different women authors coming from different sociopolitical contexts. Thus, one of the main goals will be considering the sociohistorical context of each text before and during their lecture. In order to achieve this objective, the students will be encouraged to consider the variety of French literary expression. The course broaching the question of identity will show that the first achievement of these authors is always to redefine their relationship with linguistic metropolitan material by using another cultural and linguistic baggage belonging to other territories.

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French Art and Architecture

Summer Session II (Art; 200-level; 3 credits)

Lyon’s rich heritage allows us to offer an introduction to the history of the arts. In order to sensitize students to Culture and Arts, we will both have practical workshops, lectures and visits of museums. Throughout our multiple interventions, we are trying to emphasize on the commonalities existing between arts. Indeed, it seems important that students understand the connections that exist between arts of all time, connections that strengthened in the 20th century. This course will be about the arts throughout its issues, its breakdowns but also its continuities.

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French Conversation

Summer Session I (French; 300-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (French; 300-level; 1 credit)

Mandatory one-credit course that complements the development of the linguistic skills facilitated in French courses, emphasizing the oral mode of the French language. It aims to improve students' ability to maintain a sustained monologue as well as oral interactions.

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French Cuisine

Summer Session I (200-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (200-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed to teach typical French recipes, as well as tips, serving ideas, and a bit of etiquette and customs. The lessons are arranged by meal, so that one can easily translate the lessons to real life cooking situations. In addition to learning how to make appealing appetizers and entrees, students take several classes in baking and pastries. They learn tricks and tips that can be used in daily life. Students will spend time chopping onions, peeling potatoes, cutting meat, kneading dough and beating eggs, all of it under the supervision of the cooks who can teach them the tricks of the trade and correct any mistakes. Generally, classes include one to two hours of explanations along with a practical hands-on component in the school (fully equipped and stocked kitchens where students cook).

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Government and Politics in France and Europe

Summer Session I (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course aims at showing the specificities of French politics. It will present balance of power and go into detail about each power. It will also go into detail about elections and political parties so the students can understand the roots of today’s political debate. A review of some majors policies by the presidents of the 5th Republic will be also done in order to explain some evolution in the French society and illustrate the major difference between the everlasting gap between “gauche” and “droite”. Few minutes will be spent in the beginning of ach class to answer students’ questions.

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Paris Field Study

Summer Session I (French; 200-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to optimize the benefits of the Paris tour by providing a solid historic and artistic base for studies of French language and culture. The point of departure for the course will be the sites visited on Paris and surroundings.

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Second Year French I

Summer Session I (French; 200-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 200-level; 3 credits)

Second Year French I is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed a year of college French or its equivalent. In this course, the students will learn to narrate in the main time-frames, as well as to recognize the different uses of the subjunctive mood in the expression of different degrees of certainty, the expression of wishes and advice.

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Second Year French II

Summer Session I (French; 200-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 200-level; 3 credits)

Second Year French II is a course designed for students who have completed a year and a half of college French or its equivalent and want to learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

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Seminar in French Language

Summer Session I (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Seminar is a course designed for students who have taken at least three years of French at college and want to improve the four skills in a balanced way: speaking, listening, writing and reading, as well as enhance their vocabulary and improve their grammatical accuracy.

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Third Year French I

Summer Session I (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

This is a third year course for students who have completed two years of French at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a novel or short stories will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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Third Year French II

Summer Session I (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

The focus of the course is improving the learners´ writing abilities with the analysis and the production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics will be reviewed in order to enhance and increase learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a novel or a collection of short stories will strengthen the formal instruction.

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Travel Photography

Summer Session I (Art, Journalism; 200-level; 1 credit)

Regards sur la ville : une approche de la photographie pour découvrir un environnement urbain, se l’approprier et partager sa vision. Construire une mémoire commune à partir de regards individuels différents

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Travel Writing: French Art and the Art of Being French

Summer Session I (English; 300-level; 3 credits)

“Lyon is a city that makes you hungry,” said celebrity chef Paul Boccuse about France’s other “city of lights.” This course will take on Boccuse’s concept of hungry in both real and abstract ways. Real in the sense that Lyon is the gastronomic capital of France and the whole city is engineered to coerce the taste buds into sitting down for a lengthy meal. Abstract in the sense that Lyon is not just a feast for the mouth but also for the eyes, ears, nose, skin, and mind. With Gallo-Roman ruins, art museums, sweeping cathedrals, mysterious passages, and hundreds of streets named for WWII resistance fighters, Lyon offers nourishment for a diversity of artistic appetites and sensibilities.

We will digest this artistic, sensorial experience through the genre of travel writing. Travel Writing is an exciting reflection on travel through personal stories. This course will help you produce clear, expressive prose, sharpen your eye for travel detail, and cultivate your individual voice through the lens of art in Lyon.

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