La Habana, Cuba
USAC
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La Habana Courses - 2019 January Session

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You will enroll in at least three and up to four credits. At least one 3-credit course is required. This list of courses is intended for informational purposes and does not guarantee availability or descriptions. Courses are subject to minor changes resulting from on-going curricular review, faculty assignments, and program revisions. Course availability is conditional on student interest and enrollment.

Cuban History, Society, Politics, and Latin American Culture Studies

The following courses focus on the culture and history of Cuba. Courses are taught in English unless otherwise noted in Spanish; courses taught in Spanish are for students with four or more semesters of college Spanish unless otherwise indicated.

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

Cultural Enrichment Workshops

Enhance your studies through non-credit workshops designed to provide opportunities for deeper engagement with unique aspects of Cuban life and culture.

  • Discovering Digital Photography (non-credit opportunity)

Course Descriptions

Cuban Cuisine

January Session (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

The cuisine functions as an activity that is generated in daily practice and transmitted orally from generation to generation. History is part of civilization and tells about the culture of people. The cuisine is traditional, magic, art, experience, human tenacity and also refined technique.

According to some, has to do with the family inheritance, the transmission of knowledge and a sum of traditions. No one is closer to an artist as we would say that a good cook, but there is some talent to which all human beings are not touched with the same grace.

The kitchen, like music, literature and other arts, is part of the cultural treasure of every nation to be missed. The kitchen is a symbol of identity.

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Dances of Havana and the Caribbean

January Session (Dance; 100-level; 1 credit)

The objectives of this course are to understand the antecedents of Latin American dance and to learn to perform correctly folkloric dances from Costa Rica as well as the spicier Caribbean salsa rhythms.

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Discovering Digital Photography

January Session (Workshop)

Description not available at this time.

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Government and Politics in Latin America

January Session (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)
January Session (Political Science; 600-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the core political issues facing the Our American region, which means to include the Caribbean experiences. The major problems facing this region: authoritarianism, dictatorships, revolutions, social conflicts as increase of violence, political corruption, the presence of the US policy and economic dependence from the American capital, political and economic development, “democratic transition” and the supposed consolidation of democratic practices, as well as the indigenous and other minority group rights, will be introduced in turn.

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Latin American Social Revolutions

January Session (History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course examines the major social revolutions that occurred in Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries. Beginning with the only successful slave rebellion that brought forth the independent Republic of Haiti (1791-1804), through the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions and going to the Nicaraguan Revolution. The cases of Chile and El Salvador will also be studied. Students will analyze the causes, nature and consequences of these revolutions in America.

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Peoples and Cultures of Cuba and the Caribbean

January Session (Anthropology; 400-level; 3 credits)

Students will explore the socio-political systems and historical context of Cuba and the Caribbean. This course will present contemporary theoretical perspectives that express the complex socio-economic, cultural, and political reality of the area. Students will cover the recurring topics of culture and "race"; daily life; and religion within Cuba and the Caribbean. This course will analyze ways in which these themes are common to other Latin American colonial societies. Students will draw upon the works and anthropological thinking of Fernando Ortiz; Jean Price-Mars; and C.L.R. James. The goal of this course is to provide a general anthropological overview of Cuba and the Caribbean.

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Spanish Conversation and Oral Skills

January Session (Spanish; 300-level; 1 credit)

A course that complements the development of linguistic skills emphasizing the oral mode of the Spanish language. It aims to improve students' ability to maintain a sustained monologue as well as oral interactions.

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