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Shanghai Courses – 2020 Summer Session II

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You will enroll in three to six credits in Session I and in three to five credits in Session II. Session II students taking intensive Chinese language as one of their courses may enroll in six credits. At least one 3-credit course is required in each summer session. Course availability is contingent upon student interest and enrollment and is subject to change. Please visit the USAC website for complete course descriptions and prerequisites.

Chinese Language Studies

Summer language courses are intensive, with two to five credits of Chinese taught each session. You are required to take a Chinese language or conversation course appropriate to your level to help you to assimilate into the community. Chinese Conversation is highly recommended to complement Intermediate Chinese I through Advanced Chinese II.

Session I

  • Summer Session I
    Chinese100-level2 creditsTaught in English and Chinese
    Summer Session II
    Chinese100-level2 creditsTaught in English and Chinese

    This is an introductory Chinese class. The main focuses of the class will be placed on recognizing the four tones in Putonghua (Mandarin Chinese), practicing pronunciation, learning vocabulary and expressions that are related to student daily life in a foreign country, and building fundamentals in Chinese grammar. An introduction on the origin and structure of Chinese characters (Han Zi, the writing script) will also be introduced.

    Required if not taking intensive Chinese language.

  • Summer Session I
    ChineseWorld Languages and Literatures100-level4 creditsTaught in Chinese

    In this class, you will develop the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in modern Chinese. In class, you will practice speaking and listening skills in Mandarin Chinese (known as “Putonghua” - lit. “common speech” - in the Mainland China, and “Guoyu” - lit. “national language” - elsewhere) through instructional activities and assessment activities, and role plays, etc.

    However, this class is not a conversational class. Reading and writing skills are essential and indispensable components of Chinese literacy. Students are expected to write and recognize Chinese characters covered in the text material.

    This course will also introduce Chinese culture and traditions through the language learning.

  • Summer Session I
    Chinese200-level3 creditsTaught in Chinese

    These courses emphasize the sentence structure of the Chinese language. Classes are divided into three parts: grammar, reading and writing. The objective of these courses is to further develop Chinese language skills, both oral and written. Particular emphasis on oral skills.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college Chinese.

  • Summer Session I
    Chinese300-level3 creditsTaught in Chinese

    The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature.

    Prerequisite: four semesters of college Chinese.

  • Summer Session I
    Chinese200-level2 creditsTaught in Chinese
    Summer Session II
    Chinese200-level2 creditsTaught in Chinese

    The objective of Chinese Conversation is to help beginning Chinese speakers function in a Chinese speaking society. Subjects and themes will be tailored to facilitate the needs of visiting students, and vocabulary study will reflect what students are likely to encounter in daily life. Complete understanding of the brief grammar section will be paramount to a student’s success. However, it will still primarily emphasize speaking and listening comprehension. Study of written Chinese will be limited to what will be necessary for students to engage themselves in daily life. Active participation in class is both encouraged and expected, and questions are welcome.

    This course is required for students not taking intensive Chinese language, but who have completed two semesters of college Chinese or the equivalent.

    Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college Chinese.

Session II

  • Summer Session I
    Chinese100-level2 creditsTaught in English and Chinese
    Summer Session II
    Chinese100-level2 creditsTaught in English and Chinese

    This is an introductory Chinese class. The main focuses of the class will be placed on recognizing the four tones in Putonghua (Mandarin Chinese), practicing pronunciation, learning vocabulary and expressions that are related to student daily life in a foreign country, and building fundamentals in Chinese grammar. An introduction on the origin and structure of Chinese characters (Han Zi, the writing script) will also be introduced.

    Required if not taking intensive Chinese language.

  • Summer Session II
    Chinese100-level2 creditsTaught in English and Chinese

    This course is an extension of Introduction to Chinese I. The objective is to continue improving the language-speaking skills. Subject and themes will be tailored to facilitate the needs of visiting students, and the focus will still be the daily life communication. Complete understanding of the brief grammar section will be a paramount to student’s success. However, it will still primarily emphasize speaking and listening comprehension, study of written Chinese will be limited to what will be necessary for students to engage themselves in daily life. Active participation on class is both encouraged and expected, and questions are welcome.

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Chinese Language I or the equivalent.

  • Summer Session II
    ChineseWorld Languages and Literatures100-level4 creditsTaught in Chinese

    In this class, you will develop the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in modern Chinese. In class, you will practice speaking and listening skills in Mandarin Chinese (known as “Putonghua” - lit. “common speech” - in the Mainland China, and “Guoyu” - lit. “national language” - elsewhere) through instructional activities and assessment activities, and role plays, etc.

    However, this class is not a conversational class. Reading and writing skills are essential and indispensable components of Chinese literacy. Students are expected to write and recognize Chinese characters covered in the text material. This course will also introduce Chinese culture and traditions through the language learning.

    Prerequisite: one semester of college Chinese.

  • Summer Session II
    ChineseWorld Languages and Literatures200-level3 creditsTaught in Chinese

    Students will mainly focus on improving their Chinese pronunciation and tones, learning new grammar patterns and practicing the newly learned grammar and vocabulary. Organized in-class activities include daily dictation, quizzes, memorizing text and completing oral exercises such as retelling stories, making up dialogues, giving presentations, and performing skits. Students will study a variety of texts that reflect topics including culture, simple academic subjects, political issues, as well as controversial issues and events. Students will expand their vocabulary and enhance their grammar rapidly to handle these broad subjects.

    Prerequisite: three semesters of college Chinese.

  • Summer Session II
    Chinese300-level3 creditsTaught in Chinese

    The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature.

    Prerequisite: five semesters of college Chinese.

  • Summer Session I
    Chinese200-level2 creditsTaught in Chinese
    Summer Session II
    Chinese200-level2 creditsTaught in Chinese

    The objective of Chinese Conversation is to help beginning Chinese speakers function in a Chinese speaking society. Subjects and themes will be tailored to facilitate the needs of visiting students, and vocabulary study will reflect what students are likely to encounter in daily life. Complete understanding of the brief grammar section will be paramount to a student’s success. However, it will still primarily emphasize speaking and listening comprehension. Study of written Chinese will be limited to what will be necessary for students to engage themselves in daily life. Active participation in class is both encouraged and expected, and questions are welcome.

    This course is required for students not taking intensive Chinese language, but who have completed two semesters of college Chinese or the equivalent.

    Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college Chinese.

International Business and Electives

Taught in English

The following courses are designed to familiarize you with the region and provide a multi-disciplinary perspective to your studies.

Session I

  • Summer Session I
    General BusinessPolitical ScienceSociology400-level3 creditsTaught in English

    This course aims to explore the various elements of China’s rapid rise over the past decades, that is often depicted as the “China Miracle” or “China Phenomenon.” Highlighting the most salient issues and problems faced by China in political, economic, social and international arenas, this course provides a comprehensive introduction to the historical background, institutions, progresses and challenges of China’s modern development as well as its implications to the world. This course is designed to help students develop their own analytical framework on China-related topics that are of most interest to them. This course is research question-oriented, which means students must prepare themselves to ask and answer challenging questions concerning the one “theme question” addressed in each class.

  • Summer Session I
    Nutrition200-level1 creditTaught in English

    An introduction to a local cuisine in a hands-on kitchen environment. Authentic preparations of several local dishes will be taught. Correct cooking techniques are emphasized. Readings and lectures on local food customs and traditions will support and contextualize the cooking instruction. Cuisine culture is a very important part of Chinese culture. The course will introduce the history of Chinese cuisine, with an emphasis on Shanghai, Sichuan, Cantonese, and Huaiyang Cuisine.

    This course has an additional fee for ingredients and materials.

  • Summer Session I
    International BusinessMarketing400-level3 creditsTaught in English

    The module is designed to enable students to develop marketing strategies and plans in and across a range of different international market environments. As well as extending students' marketing and strategic skills obtained in earlier modules into a global context, it develops knowledge and skills in international marketing processes.

  • Summer Session I
    Speech Communications300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    We often think about persuasion primarily in instrumental and individualistic terms—how does one individual go about getting something s/he wants from another person? Although this instrumental sense of persuasion has its value, this course will encourage you to broaden the term; that is, to think about the cultural, social, economic and political aspects of persuasion.

    This course is primarily “consumer”-oriented. This means that it focuses on the critique of persuasive messages using a variety of critical and theoretical approaches to persuasion. This course will continually ask you what we are being asked to do, believe, and value, and how messages are structured to get us to come to those beliefs and values.

    While the study of persuasion has been an age-old topic, it acquires new and critical importance in the current age of technological advances. By paying attention to how various media shape the context in which today’s persuasion takes place, this course aims to develop your abilities as an observer and informed practitioner of persuasive communication.

Session II

  • Summer Session II
    Entrepreneurship General Business400-level3 creditsTaught in English

    This course is designed to teach students about entrepreneurship and give them actual hands on experience as to what it takes to transform an idea into a fundable business. The course will cover all of the elements an entrepreneur starting a new business must go through to be properly prepared to start, grow and run a successful business. Major elements will include developing soft skills in team building and leadership, developing a due diligence and presentation package, selecting and working with investors, the “Pitch” and what to expect after funding.

    Prerequisites: Introductory-level college business or entrepreneurship course

  • Summer Session II
    International BusinessManagement400-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Entering the new millennium, the environment that corporations operate in has been developed beyond recognition. Along with information technology, international management is the major challenge facing organisations in the new century. Students must now be knowledgeable about the international dimensions of management.

    Prerequisite: introductory business course.

  • Summer Session II
    Environmental SciencePolitical Science300-level3 creditsTaught in English

    Students will explore climate change as a lens through which to contemplate sustainable development goals primarily in China, but also internationally. They will become acquainted with the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals as a broad framework for this while using Shanghai as a laboratory for how such policies are implemented at a local level. The course will begin by introducing the concept of sustainability, including its competing claims, and then seeks to offer a framework through which to understand how goals of sustainable development develop linkages between various seemingly separate social, ecological, and environmental policies. Students will work to frame their visions of sustainability through both data-driven and narrative analysis. Reading will include a wide array of materials from international climate change documents to short stories.

  • Summer Session II
    Recreation / Physical Education100-level1 creditTaught in English

    As part of the program, you will have the opportunity to practice Tai Chi two hours each week. Tai Chi is the traditional Chinese martial art which is used by many Chinese today to stay physically fit, and which provides insights on the culture and philosophy of the Chinese.

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.edu

Quick Details

2020-21 App. Cycle

Fall/Yearlong: Cancelled

Spring: Open

Spring Accelerated (Jan-March): Open

2021-22 App. Cycle

Summer programs: Opens 9/1

Fall/Yearlong: Opens 9/1

Spring: Opens 9/1

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Approval from Home University

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

US Credit

Program Capacity

50 students

Instruction

English | Chinese

Passport & Visa

Passport & Visa Information