Santiago, Chile
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Santiago, Chile | 2018 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of a language track plus electives in literature and language, Latin American culture, and international studies. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Spanish Language Tracks

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks in which courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in a track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it to be prepared for success at the next level. Language courses are small and typically have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each.

Track I (14 credits total)—Prerequisite: none

Track II (12 credits total)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

Track III (9 credits total)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

Track IV (6 credits total)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

Fall Semester

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in Spanish

Latin American, Anthropological, and International Studies

Courses are taught in English unless noted in Spanish; courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III and above unless otherwise indicated.

Spring Semester

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in Spanish

Latin American, Anthropological, and International Studies

Courses are taught in English unless noted in Spanish; courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III and above unless otherwise indicated.

Field Studies

Deepen your academic experience through a 1-credit field study course where you will explore the cultural, historical, and natural features of a distinctive region of Chile through carefully planned excursions. These experiences combined with academic components (readings, research, written assignments, reports, etc.) deepen your understanding of the sites and locales visited. To participate, students are required to enroll in the field study course and complete the assigned work. This course cannot be taken as an audit and counts as part of your credit load. Optional field studies have an additional fee and are subject to meeting minimum enrollment requirements to run. In the fall semester, the field study will go to Northern Chile; in spring it will be in Southern Chile.

Internships

It is important to note that most spring semester internships start in March, due to the Chilean summer break, and are therefore only eligible for 1-2 credits.

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development and are counted as part of your credit load. Students are placed in a Spanish-speaking environment, with high exposure to culture and language, and must be able to communicate at an advanced language level. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses.

Santiago internships fall into the broad categories of education, social welfare, museums, and hotel/hospitality. Previous placements have included: teaching English; communication, broadcasting and design in non-profit institutions; giving workshops to children; and leading spare time activities to children affected by cancer and psychiatric disabilities. Other internship sites are possible. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor on site.

Eligibility: enrollment in the Santiago program, a minimum GPA of 3.0, Track III or IV Spanish proficiency, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professor is also teaching as a Visiting Professor.

Spring

Dr. Emily Wakild, Boise State University

Courses offered:

Dr. Emily Wakild researches the social and environmental history of revolution and the comparative history of conservation. Her book, Revolutionary Parks, was based on research as a Fulbright scholar in Mexico and it won three national book awards. She did undergraduate study in Ecuador and Cuba and has led courses in Peru.

Course Descriptions

Advanced Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Este curso de español de nivel avanzado ha sido diseñado para alumnos que ya hayan completado tres años de español y, aunque no presenten problemas de comunicación para realizar tareas cotidianas, precisen perfeccionar su control sobre los diferentes registros del español oral y escrito. Asimismo, este curso ofrece a los alumnos a la oportunidad de ampliar su vocabulario en ámbitos más específicos y técnicos y de mejorar la precisión gramatical en su producción tanto oral como escrita.

This advanced level course of Spanish has been designed for students who have completed three years of Spanish and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

Back to Top

Advanced Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

El curso Español Avanzado II (SPN 411) ha sido diseñado para alumnos que ya hayan completado más de tres años de español y, aunque no presenten problemas de comunicación para realizar tareas cotidianas, precisen perfeccionar su control sobre los diferentes registros del español oral y escrito. Asimismo, este curso le ofrece al alumno la oportunidad de mejorar la coherencia y cohesión de su producción tanto oral como escrita y su corrección gramatical.

Advanced Spanish II (SPN 411) has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of Spanish and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

Back to Top

Advanced Spanish Writing and Stylistics

Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed as a writing workshop for students with an advanced-superior level of Spanish. Its final goal is that the student develops personal and effective writing strategies. The composing process is broken down into different stages: an analysis of the communicative situation, brain storming, idea organization, composing, proofreading, editing and evaluating.

Back to Top

Chilean History

Fall (History; 300-level; 3 credits)

In this course, we will study the primary events and processes from the Conquest to the present. The course is divided into three main sections: The conquest and colonial period; the 19th century including the Independence; and, the 20th century, including rural migration to the city, the role of the woman, the “Social Question” in Chile, and the military overthrow of the Allende and the political, economic and social consequences of the dictatorship and the transition towards democracy.

Back to Top

Chile's Native Cultures and Languages: Northern Chile

Fall (400-level; 3 credits)

This course provides an overview of Chile’s native cultures focusing on the northern region, encompassing diverse cultural contexts, from the ancient Aymaras and Atacameños, to more recently recognized indigenous groups. This course will introduce the important aspects of these cultures, including prehistory, myths, religion, economy and social organization; how these elements combine to form cultural identities and the transformations undergone in historical times and up to the present day.

Back to Top

Chile's Native Cultures and Languages: Southern Chile

Spring (400-level; 3 credits)

This course will focus on the diverse indigenous Cultures of Southern Chile (Patagonian Cultures, Mapuche, etc.) as well as the Polynesian culture of Rapa Nui. It will provide an insight into the basics of these societies and how the Western world has changed dramatically their way of living and traditions, since the first contacts between these two worlds.

Back to Top

Dances of Latin America

Fall (Dance; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Dance; 100-level; 1 credit)

This course aims to give students a comprehensive introduction to a variety of dances of Latin America. The course follows a practical model, in which students learn the essential steps of a selection of four dances typical of the region. Through the medium of dance, it is hoped that students will acquire a greater understanding and interest in Latin American culture.

The course is divided into once-weekly sessions of a period of four months. Each session lasts two hours and will cover one Latin American rhythm. The rhythms to be covered include: Merengue, Salsa, Chachacha, Bachata and Tango.

Back to Top

Elementary Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish I is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Spanish courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

Español Inicial I es un curso de lengua de cuatro créditos para alumnos que están matriculados en USAC y no hayan realizado nunca cursos de español a nivel universitario. Está diseñado para ayudar a los alumnos de español como lengua extranjera a adquirir una competencia comunicativa básica, ofreciendo oportunidades para desarrollar las habilidades básicas de la lengua: oír, hablar, interactuar, leer y escribir. El énfasis principal de este curso está en la comunicación y por lo tanto, la asistencia a clase es esencial.

Back to Top

Elementary Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish II is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have taken one course of Spanish at college-level or its equivalent before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence. It provides opportunities for the development of the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

El curso de Español Elemental II de cuatro créditos está dirigido a alumnos que se matriculen en USAC y que hayan completado un curso de español en la universidad o su equivalente. Está diseñado para ayudar a los hablantes no nativos de español a desarrollar su competencia comunicativa. Ofrece oportunidades para desarrollar las habilidades básicas de la lengua: escuchar, hablar, interactuar, leer y escribir. El énfasis principial de este curso es la comunicación, por lo que la asistencia a clase es esencial.

Back to Top

Intermediate Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Español Intermedio I es un curso de tres créditos dirigido a alumnos que hayan completado un año de español en la universidad o cursos equivalentes. En este curso los alumnos aprenderán a narrar en los principales marcos temporales, así como a reconocer los usos del subjuntivo para la expresión de diferentes grados de certeza, de deseos y de consejos.

Intermediate Spanish I is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed a year of college Spanish or its equivalent. In this course, the students will learn to narrate in the main time-frames, as well as to recognize the different uses of the subjunctive mood in the expression of different degrees of certainty, of wishes and of advices.

Back to Top

Intermediate Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermedio II es un curso diseñado para alumnos que hayan completado un año y medio de español en la universidad o cursos equivalentes y quieran aprender a utilizar la lengua con mayor complejidad sintáctica y corrección gramatical que en cursos anteriores, haciendo especial énfasis en el cambio de marcos temporales y en la expresión de hipótesis y de diferentes grados de certeza.

Intermediate II is a course designed for students who have completed a year and a half of college Spanish or its equivalent and want to learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

Back to Top

International Political Economy and Business: Globalizing Latin America I

Fall (Economics, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)
Fall (Economics, Political Science; 600-level; 3 credits)

In the last decades of the twentieth century, the Latin American economies found themselves in a profound economic, social and political crisis. In response to this, the governments implemented a set of profound pro-market reforms, a.k.a. the Washington Consensus. After decades of protectionism, the economies were now opened up to foreign trade and investment. Market forces were favored instead of State intervention. Social policy based on solidarity was replaced by individual risk-taking. The initial results were more than favorable, but the weaknesses of this new paradigm were revealed during the Asian crisis (1997) which triggered a backlash against the Washington Consensus in Latin America and it is uncertain whether the pro-market reforms will be deepened adjusted, or even reversed.

In this course we will study the process of economic aperture alongside with weakened social safety-nets. Specifically, we will assess the economic structure and performance of Latin American countries, together with its most important policy components.

Back to Top

Introduction to Politics in Latin America

Fall (History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

Political regimes are an essential ingredient to understand economic development. It is widely believed that democracy is the primary vehicle to foster economic development. However, democracy is not a natural state of affairs in Latin America. Since its independence in the early nineteenth century, authoritarian regimes have been rather the rule than the exception. However, since the latest wave of democratization of the late twentieth century, democracy appears to have gained a firm clout in Latin American societies. Despite economic and political instability – and even crisis –, the core values of democracy have been far more resilient than many observers would have believed. At the same time, the so-called “pink-tide” of the early 2000s has been witness to various on-going political experiments of democratization. However, various authoritarian streaks beg the question to what extent these experiments can be regarded democratic regimes.

At the same time, Latin America’s experience with economic and political development suggests that the relationship between democracy and economic development isn’t that clear or obvious.

In this course we will study Latin America’s recent experience with democracy. Specifically, we will assess the degree to which the pink-tide has contributed to the democratization and its relationship with economic performance using a multidisciplinary methodological approach.

Back to Top

Latin America and its Cultures

Fall (Anthropology, History, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course provides an overview of Latin American Culture, focusing on Chilean realities, encompassing diverse cultural contexts, from ancient Pre-Columbian cultures to the latest expressions of Latin American popular culture. This course will introduce basic notions of cultural studies; including prehistory, religion, art, economy and social organization; how they integrate to form different cultural identities and how they face modern challenges in the light of a globalized world.

Back to Top

Latin America, Technology, and Globalization I

Fall (Political Science, Spanish; 300-level; 1 credit)

The belief of this course is that technology is a tool that fosters progress in globalization.

The course presents a perspective of what the participation of Latin-American within the technological process in globalization has been, and that has continued developing since the XX century.

Back to Top

Latin American Art and Society

Fall (Art, History, Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

This is an introductory course about the main elements that form a mixed Latin American society in relation to visual culture. As a starting point, the proposal is to analyze the relation between tradition and modernity as a way to describe tensions and ongoing processes among different societies of the region. This course combines lectures and field trips to different museums in order to allow a more developed understanding as from the knowledge and work of Chilean and Latin American artists and authors.

Back to Top

Latin American Technology and International Relations

Spring (Political Science, Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

The aim of this course is to understand technology as a tool that allows globalization. In this course, we will analyze the Latin American participation in the technological process and in the process of globalization that has been occurring since the 20th century. In addition, we will study some of the experiences related to technological launchings and their consequences in different countries of the region.

Back to Top

Modern Latin American History

Spring (History; 300-level; 3 credits)

This class explores the transition of Spanish and Portuguese colonies into free and independent nations. It traces the development of a place today called Latin America through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and explores political, social, economic, and cultural changes that occurred throughout the region. We will question how and why this region changed over the modern period and how Latin America influenced, and was influenced by, global historical trends. The course will focus on familiar themes, such as development, nationalism, populism, and even the very idea of Latin America, to explore major issues and individuals in a diverse region.

Back to Top

Northern Chile Field Study

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)

The Field Studies Trip to Northern Chile consists of a didactic and recreational experience in one of the areas of greatest historical, cultural, scientific and ecological importance in the country, namely the Pre-Colombian town of San Pedro and its surroundings. This area, which includes the Salar de Atacama, the Cordillera de la Sal and the Andean plateau with its millenarian human settlements, constitutes one of the richest and most complex sources of the historical fabric of the High Andean cultures and their expression in language, religiosity, arts, architecture, economy, astronomy and ecology, among others. This study trip is designed to provide a theoretical and practical exploration and reflection on the cultural heritage of the ancient Andean cultures, their mixing and conflict from the Spanish conquest onwards, and their importance in contemporary society.

Back to Top

Southern Chile Field Study

Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)

Students who choose to participate on the Southern Chile Tour have the opportunity to add this 1-credit field study to explore Latin America and its cultures in more depth. Students will be given readings, will be expected to keep a journal during the tour, and will have a follow up project after the tour. The tour itinerary includes visits to Puerto Montt and the fishing port of Angelmó with its traditional markets; the famous ferry crossing to Chiloe Island, the second biggest island in South America with traditional mixed European and native culture; tours of the famed wooden churches of Chiloe, a UNESCO World Heritage Site; Puerto Varas and the lakes, rapids, and rain forests of the Llanquihue Region with its stunning volcanic panorama. The trip also introduces you to the typical small towns of the German colonization and a refreshing visit to the Aguas Calientes thermal baths.

Back to Top

Spanish Composition I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Este es un curso de tercer año de español para alumnos que ya han completado dos años de español en la universidad o su equivalente. El peso del curso recae en mejorar las habilidades escritas de los alumnos, con el análisis primero y la producción después, de diferentes tipos de textos. Asimismo, se revisarán una serie de puntos gramaticales con objeto de ir ampliando y afinando la competencia gramatical de los alumnos. La lectura extensiva de una novela corta acompañará y hará de refuerzo de la instrucción recibida.

This is a third year couse for students who have completed two years of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a short novel will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

Back to Top

Spanish Composition II

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Composition II is designed for students with 5 semester of college level Spanish language Study. The focus of this course is to improve learners´ written abilities through the analysis first and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics will be reviewed in order to enhance and refine the learners´ grammatical competence.

Composición II está diseñado para estudiantes con 5 semestre de nivel universitario español estudio. El objetivo de este curso es mejorar estudiante escrito primero de capacidades mediante el análisis y la posterior producción de diferentes tipos de textos. Además, un número de temas gramaticales se revisarán a fin de mejorar y perfeccionar la competencia gramatical de estudiante.

Back to Top

Spanish Conversation and Oral Skills

Fall (300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

Back to Top

Survey of Latin American Literature I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

A panoramic vision of Latin American literature, from its beginnings to the 20th century. The course will study the evolution of different genre, fundamentally the novel, poetry and theater, through their more important movements, as well as representative key works.

Back to Top

Survey of Latin American Literature II

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

A broad view of the evolution of the different literary genres of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries during the 20th century. Several key works will be studied as well as many literary fragments in order to provide a well-rounded vision of this century, including García Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Borges, Vargas Llosa and others.

Back to Top

The Promise and Challenge of Patagonia

Spring (History; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues and individuals that have shaped the cultural and ecological region of Patagonia. Commonly defined as the southernmost regions of Chile and Argentina (excepting Antarctica), this frontier region has a unique past and present. In this course, we trace the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that occurred throughout the region. We consider terrestrial and sea-faring indigenous peoples, early scientific explorers such as Charles Darwin, and transnational phenomena such as cattle smuggling, oil drilling, salmon farming, and tourism. Drawing upon films, stories, and scholarly articles we explore various perspectives on the past.

Back to Top

Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Latin American Cinema

Spring (Art, Film, Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course proposes to present a Pan-American vision of Latin American cinema from 1950 to the present. Using a historical perspective, the course will reveal the relationships established between societies and cinema, observing how these links are made in different aesthetics, expressing different cinematographic language and content. In this way, the cultural imagery which has formed part of the artistic tradition of the continent will be analyzed.

Back to Top

Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Latin American Novel

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Fall (Spanish; 600-level; 3 credits)

Participants in this course will read and discuss works of modern fiction by leading Latin American novelists. The course will focus on issues of literary achievement, the author’s vision of Latin American society, and their relationships to the main currents of modern literature. Several films, based on the selected novels, will also be shown.

Back to Top

Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Latin American Poetry

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Fall (Spanish; 600-level; 3 credits)

Presents a clear and thorough study of Latin American poetry from the period of the Vanguards (20's) until present, taking into account its diversity and experimentations. Students will study the texts within the historical context in which they were written. Selected authors: Gabriela Mistral, Vicente Huidobro, Cesar Vallejo, Juana de Ibarbourou, Pablo Neruda, Ernesto Cardenal, Nicanor Parra, Alejandra Pizarnik and Jorge Teillier.

Back to Top

Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Latin American Short Story and Essay

Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 600-level; 3 credits)

This course is based on the study of 20th century and contemporary Latin American short stories written in Spanish. During the semester we will examine the evolution of the short story in different periods, and key authors in the production of this literary genre. Each text will be studied from an aesthetic viewpoint and in the cultural and historical context in which it has been written, with an emphasis on authors from the Southern Cone (Argentina, Uruguay and Chile). We will also look at the art of short story writing in the context of contemporary modern art, and its contact with and influence on modern North American and European short stories.

Back to Top

Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Latin American Theatre

Spring (Spanish, Theater; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish, Theater; 600-level; 3 credits)

During the first half of this course we will read and analyze contemporary Spanish American plays. During the second half, students will produce, direct and perform one of the plays studied earlier. This will include the development of sets, costumes etc. Class-time will be used for literary analysis, drama exercises, rehearsals and logistical organization. Although not a "professional" production, participants will be expected to dedicate a substantial amount of energy to the show. Discussions will be conducted in Spanish.

Back to Top

Women and Society: Latin American Perspectives

Fall (Anthropology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Anthropology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course focuses on the discussion of the problems faced by women in Latin American societies. These problems will be understood as a product of the male-female interrelations given by the different Latin American cultures, societies and ideologies. In addition, it will be reviewed how these identities have experienced and are experiencing these difficulties nowadays, especially in Chile.

The course will approach the role of women in "developed" societies from different critical perspectives, contrasting what has happened with Latin American women and their cultures throughout history.

Back to Top